Tag Archives: William Hurt

Review: Winter’s Tale

Winters_Tale_Poster1“Winter’s Tale” is not a true story nor a love story, but rather, the comedy of the year.

Based on Mark Helprin’s 1983 novel, “Winter’s Tale” focuses on Colin Farrell’s Peter Lake. We meet Peter when he’s just a baby in 1895. His parents so desperately want to come to the United States, but because they’ve got heart conditions, they’re not allowed in. However, it doesn’t have to be that way for baby Peter. Instead of re-boarding their boat and heading back home together, they plop the infant into a tiny model boat, lower him down from their own and then watch as he presumably sails off to New York City.

That covers just about ten minutes of the movie, but right there you’ve already got two devastating problems. First off, this movie is one of magical realism. You’re not going to get a theater full of people to buy into that unless you establish it right from the start. This odd display of two parents risking their child’s life in an absurd effort to give him a better one does not do that in the least, making it even more difficult to adjust and accept when magic is thrown into the equation a little later on. And that brings us to detrimental issue #2, believability. There are countless scenes in this movie when characters are doing or saying something oh-so seriously that makes little to no sense and that turns out to be a highly successful formula for creating laugh-out-loud-worthy moments.

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Review: The Host

The-Host-PosterThe author of “The Twilight Saga” and the director of “Gattaca” just had a baby – an unintentionally laughable, nonsensical, ugly baby.

“The Host” takes place in a future time when an alien race called the Souls invade Earth. Rather than blow up the White House or zap people with lasers, the Souls take over human bodies and use them to turn the planet back into a clean, safe place. They may have good intentions, but clearly claiming bodies without human consent doesn’t fly and the few that manage to escape the colonization form a resistance.

Melanie Stryder (Saoirse Ronan) is part of that resistance until she’s captured by a Seeker (Diane Kruger) and fitted with her very own Soul, Wanderer. Wanderer assumes control, but Melanie isn’t about to give up that easily and while Wanderer tries to obey the Seeker and use Melanie’s memories to track down the remainder of the resistance, those memories and Melanie’s powers of persuasion make Wanderer doubt the Soul’s cause. Using their shared body, the two team up to find Melanie’s little brother, Jamie (Chandler Canterbury), and boyfriend, Jared (Max Irons), and do what they can to keep as many people and Souls alive.

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Review: The Yellow Handkerchief

The Yellow Handkerchief. Who came up with that? There is nothing stimulating about that title. Forgiveness could be granted if this so-called yellow handkerchief had a defining moment in the film, but no. In fact, the yellow handkerchief’s 15 seconds of fame could have been easily replaced by something much bolder. Perhaps hoisting a yellow sail on a small boat? Just like the unnecessary inclusion of the yellow hanky, director Udayan Prasad makes the film tiresome by searching for meaning in vague places when the film works best in its simplicity.

After spending six years in jail, Brett Hanson (William Hurt) returns to civilization. With no one to greet him at the prison gates, he drifts along and into a quaint town for no other reason but to enjoy the long lost taste of an ice-cold beer. In an effort to escape her own troubles, Martine (Kristen Stewart) takes an opportunity to hitch a ride with a complete stranger, a rather slow young guy named Gordy (Eddie Redmayne). The trio of strangers randomly decide to venture off on a scenic tour of post-Katrina Louisiana heading straight for New Orleans.

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