Tag Archives: Tribeca

Interview: Cuban Fury’s Nick Frost & Rashida Jones

Nick_Frost_InterviewNick Frost leads Cuban Fury as Bruce. Way back when, young Bruce was a rising salsa star. He proudly strut around in his bejeweled shirts and pristine dancing shoes, collecting trophies and titles left and right – that is until a group of bullies showed Bruce what they thought of his hobby. Years later, Bruce’s dancing shoes are collecting dust and he’s spending his days working safe and sound at a desk job. However, when he finds out his beautiful new boss, Rashida Jones’ Julia, has a little thing for salsa herself, his little thing for her inspires him to give dancing another go.

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Interview: Beware The Gonzo’s Ezra Miller and Zoe Kravitz

It’s been just over a year since Beware the Gonzo charmed audiences at the Tribeca Film Festival and it’s no wonder that both Ezra Miller and Zoë Kravitz have been busy ever since. In the movie Miller stars as Gonzo, a high school kid with some intense ambitions. When the school golden boy, Riley (Jesse McCartney), uses his power as the paper’s editor-in-chief to stifle Gonzo’s creativity and zest, Gonzo opts to start his own paper, one outside the school’s jurisdiction (to a point): The Gonzo Files. Also with a vendetta against Riley, Kravitz’s character, Evie, opts to join the ranks of The Gonzo Files and fight back by doing whatever it takes to bring the student body the truth.

After speaking with Miller and Kravitz, it’s quite clear as to why director Bryan Goluboff added them to his roster; they’re both incredibly passionate and are willing to fight for what they want. We talked about Beware the Gonzo quite a bit, but the conversation also trailed off into real-life territory and their struggle trying to make it in a business with a preference for casting 20-somethings as high school teens. From my standpoint, Miller and Kravitz appear to have thriving careers, but both admit to have experienced some troubling times along the way and, quite naturally, concern for the future.

At the same time, these are two very fun-loving people we’re talking about and the giggles were abound in this interview. To level the playing field, I opted to leave in a little cell phone oops on my part, as I’m hoping you’ll get as good of a laugh out of it as we did. Check it all out for yourself in the video interview below and be sure to catch Beware the Gonzo when it hits theaters on September 9th.

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Tribeca Review: Janie Jones

World, watch out for Abigail Breslin. Thanks to nine years of work, we know she’s a talented actress, but Janie Jones really proves she’s on another level. The film not only reveals her as an incredibly talented singer, but as an actress who can take a subpar script, breathe life into it and make it somewhat enjoyable.

Breslin is Janie Jones, a 13-year-old with an addict for a mother (Elisabeth Shue). When mom decides to get clean, she opts to leave Janie with her father, semi-rock star Ethan Brand (Alessandro Nivola). Too bad Ethan doesn’t even know he has a kid. Despite being unconvinced he’s really the father, when Janie’s mother bails, Ethan is left with no choice but to bring Janie aboard his tour bus.

Janie isn’t troublesome in the least; it’s her father that causes all the problems. Not only does he stomp around unwilling to accept the fact that he has a child, but his drinking gets out of control as does his attitude. When his escapades become too much to handle, Ethan’s band and manager decide it’s time to part ways leaving Ethan and Janie alone.

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Tribeca Interview: Janie Jones’ Alessandro Nivola And Abigail Breslin

Thanks to Little Miss Sunshine, we know Abigail Breslin has some dance moves… kind of. But since when can she sing? Her Janie Jones co-star, Alessandro Nivola, already had some musical ability having sung in Laurel Canyon, but Breslin was going in cold. Well, as quickly as this young actress adapts from character to character is as quickly as she picked up on singing and guitar-playing because she and Nivola successfully take their performances one step further in David M. Rosenthal’s Janie Jones, creating not only compelling characters, but a fantastic soundtrack, too. 

Nivola plays Ethan Brand, the front man in a band whose tour is interrupted when an ex-fling decides it’s time to introduce him to his daughter, Janie Jones. When mom splits and leaves Janie behind, Ethan’s left with no choice, but to take her in and let her hit the road with the band. Trouble is, not only is Ethan incredibly uncomfortable with playing dad, but he’s harboring an alcohol problem as well. When everything boils over and he teeters on the edge of losing everything he’s worked for, the only one capable of grounding him is the loving and talented daughter he never even knew he had. 

As nerve-racking as it was for Breslin to adapt to singing and playing the guitar, one of the most jarring changes was that of the actor playing her dad. Nivola stepped in just days before shooting began and only met Breslin the day before the camera rolled. (Or so they claim. It could all be CGI, couldn’t it?) Anyway, in honor of Janie Jones’ US Premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival, Nivola and Breslin sat down to tell us all about their roles, experience working together, their next projects and much more. Check it all out for yourself in the video interview below and keep an eye out for the film, which is due out in theaters and on VOD this summer. 

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Tribeca Review: Saint

Saint has two things working against it; it’s subtitled and foreign. No, there’s nothing wrong with requiring an audience to read some text or with a film coming from another country; the problem is the subtitles are often illegible and a number of the jokes are geared towards a Dutch audience. What the rest of us end up with is a confusing and unfunny, albeit visually stimulating, horror comedy.

On December 5th, 1492 a murderous saint went on a killing spree in an Amsterdam village. While many lives were lost, the townsfolk got their revenge, burning Saint Nick to death by setting fire to his boat. However, their immediate victory turned into a long-term nightmare with Saint Nick vowing to return on the anniversary of his death when the moon is full on Christmas.

Fast forward to present time when the tale of Saint Nick is a mere urban legend. When the innocent myth turns into a gruesome reality for a group of teens, they’re left helpless, nobody believing that the curse is true and Saint Nick indeed returns to town every 32 years to claim the lives of as many people as possible with the help of his evil Black Peters.

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Tribeca Video Interview: Sun City Picture House Executive Producer Olivia Wilde

We all know Olivia Wilde for her work on House, the monster hit Tron: Legacy as well as a slew of other noteworthy films, but what’s the actress up to when she’s not in front of the camera? Ever since last year’s earthquake, Wilde donates a significant amount of her time to working with an organization called Artists for Peace and Justice in an effort to restore Haiti’s hospitals, schools and orphanages. Even while she’s helping get these essentials back up and running, though, she wants to make sure they have a source of entertainment as well.

After the quake took down the last of Haiti’s functioning movie theaters, aide workers David Darg and Bryn Mooser decided to enlist in the help of the local citizens to create a new one, the Sun City Picture House; as they put the theater together they also made a short film about it, and that’s where Wilde stepped in. Wilde and Maria Bello served as Sun City Picture House’s executive producers doing everything and anything they could to not only assist in the production of this short film, but in the completion and preservation of the Sun City Picture House, too.

Wilde calls Sun City Picture House “my proudest moment in my career.” Hear all about her experience working on this production from Wilde herself in the video interview below.

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Tribeca Interview: The Miners’ Hymns’ David Metcalfe And Bill Morrison

Think you’re a found footage expert having seen everything from The Blair Witch Project to Paranormal Activity? Well, this might blow you away; not only does this year’s Tribeca Film Festival boast two fictional found footage-style films, but a non-fiction one, too! It’s a documentary called The Miners’ Hymns.

Director Bill Morrison is known for using shots bearing signs of chemical deterioration, further enhancing the decay through digital processing, but here, he uses pristine black and white material from the British National Archives as well as some gorgeous freshly shot color footage. Morrison combined the two in his effort to reconstruct the history of coal mining in Durham, England, including the miners’ strike of 1984. A documentary with zero dialogue, talking heads or narration, The Miners’ Hymns relies solely on Morrison’s construction and Jóhann Jóhannsson’s score to express a narrative.

In time with The Miners’ Hymns premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival both Morrison and the film’s producer, David Metcalfe, sat down to tell us about the production of the film beginning with Metcalfe approaching Morrison about making the film to Morrison having to create imagery to accompany Jóhannsson’s music and more. Hear it all for yourself in the video interview below.

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Tribeca Review: Angels Crest

As much as going to the theater should be an enjoyable experience, there’s nothing wrong with checking out a sad piece. However, nobody goes to the movies to just wade around in a character’s problems; you need to experience the person’s emotional range in order to understand and appreciate their hardships. Unfortunately, in Angels Crest’s case, there’s no variation of sentiment in the least, just one long depressing note.

Thomas Dekker is Ethan, a young father of a 3-year-old boy named Nathan (Ameko Eks Mass Carroll). One cold morning, Nathan wakes up early and convinces his dad to hit the road and take him to the snowy mountains of Angels Crest. By the time they get there, Nathan is fast asleep, so Ethan opts to head out alone to sneak a peek at the local wildlife. Only 20 minutes later, Ethan returns to his truck and Nathan is nowhere to be found. The townsfolk come out to help Ethan and the police look for Nathan, but it isn’t until the next morning that Ethan finds his son, frozen to death, buried in the snow.

Not only is Ethan crushed by the loss, feeling guilty for his carelessness and simply missing his son, but he’s also suffering with the pressure of some of his neighbors who outwardly blame him for the accident, most notably, Nathan’s mother, Cindy (Lynn Collins). However, there are those who sympathize with Ethan’s situation like his good friend Jane (Elizabeth McGovern). As for Angie (Mira Sorvino), the woman who runs the local diner, as much as she empathizes with Ethan, as a mother herself, she can’t help but to notice the poor parenting decision. Worst of all, a local District Attorney (Jeremy Piven) plans to go after Ethan and prosecute him for his negligence.

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Tribeca Interview: Sun City Picture House’s David Darg, Olivia Wilde And Bryn Mooser

In the wake of the 2010 Haiti earthquake, many were left without food, water, shelter and other vital necessities. However, while working to restore fundamental essentials, Bryn Mooser and Adam Darg also fought to bring some fun and entertainment back into the local population’s lives. The quake took down the last of the country’s few functioning movie theaters so, with the help of Sun City residents, Mooser and Darg worked to build a new one, the Sun City Picture House.

Having made many fundraising pieces, both Mooser and Darg were familiar with the filmmaking process and opted to put those skills to use by documenting their work in a short film. The duo also attracted the attention of actresses Olivia Wilde and Maria Bello, both of whom donated a great deal of time to the Haiti relief effort and continue to do so today. Between Mooser, Darg, Wilde, Bello and the help of local supporters, it was merely a matter of days before the Sun City Picture House went from a noble idea to a reality.

To celebrate Sun City Picture House’s debut at the Tribeca Film Festival Darg, Mooser and Wilde came out to further support their short documentary and the continued effort to rebuild Haiti. Check out everything the trio had to say about building the theater, creating this film and much more in the video interview below.

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Tribeca Interview: Angels Crest’s Jeremy Piven

Hopefully you’re ready to see Jeremy Piven’s serious side because in one of his latest films, Angels Crest, Piven really turns on the drama tackling some rather troubling subject matter. The film stars Thomas Dekker as Ethan, a young father who opts to leave his sleeping three-year-old son in the car alone for a matter of minutes. When Ethan returns, his little boy is gone and soon found dead in the snow. Piven steps in as a local district attorney with zero sympathy for Ethan’s grief, looking to prosecute him for his negligence.

Piven says it himself; this character is about as far from Entourage’s Ari Gold as he can get. He’s soft spoken, unkempt and evidently being eaten away by his troubled past. However, oddly enough, Piven was “thrilled to play him.” Then again, it’s easy to see why Piven was elated to be part of the project. Angels Crest packs a powerful cast including Dekker, Mira Sorvino, Kate Walsh, Lynn Collins and Elizabeth McGovern as well as a talented director, Gaby Dellal.

In honor of Angels Crest’s world premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival, Piven sat down to tell us all about his experience making this film, what he’s working on next and a little bit about his toughest critic, his six-year-old niece, Pearl.

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