Tag Archives: Sean Bean

Review: Silent Hill: Revelation 3D

A shirtless guy gets shot, he falls to the ground, the main character presumes him dead yet he’s clearly still breathing. No, he doesn’t get up for that cliché one last scare, the film just moves on. And that’s one of the lesser ways in which “Silent Hill: Revelation 3D” asks the viewer to suspend his or her belief.

Six years after the events of the first film, Sharon is all grown up and goes by the name Heather Mason (Adelaide Clemens). She and her dad, Harry (Sean Bean), have been on the run ever since escaping Silent Hill, but with no memory of her past, Heather is unaware of what she’s truly running from. However, on the eve of her 18th birthday, Heather comes home to find Harry missing and the message “Come to Silent Hill” written on the wall in a bloody scrawl. With the help of a guy from school named Vincent (Kit Harington), Heather heeds the call and returns to the town of ash, creepy nurses, mannequin monsters and bloody bunnies.

“Silent Hill: Revelation” didn’t sound all that bad until that last sentence, did it? The 2006 film wasn’t the worst of the worst, but most certainly didn’t warrant a sequel, yet “Revelation” still had potential. Silent Hill is a cinematic town, packed with tons of curious creatures and vivid design elements as well as an ever-falling ash that’s ideal for 3D. But sadly, whether you’re a fan of the source material or not, the “Silent Hill: Revelation” narrative is so expositional and nonsensical, it drags all other portions of the production down with it.

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Interview: Silent Hill: Revelation 3D Writer-Director Michael J. Bassett

Expectations are always sky high when making a feature film, but the pressure is on more so than ever when you’re adapting material with a strong fan base, and so is the case with writer-director Michael J. Bassett and “Silent Hill: Revelation 3D.”

The film has roots in the third game of the franchise, focusing on an 18-year-old Sharon, now going by the name Heather Mason (Adelaide Clemens). Ever since her escape from Silent Hill, she and her father, Harry (Sean Bean), have been on the run, but because Heather remembers nothing from her time in the town of evil creatures and falling ash, she doesn’t even know what she’s up against. When her father is abducted and a bloody message instructs her to “Come to Silent Hill,” Heather’s got no choice, but to re-enter her worst nightmare.

And Heather’s worst nightmare is more like Bassett’s dream come true. An avid fan of the games and the 2006 film, Bassett’s “Silent Hill” is oozing with grisly imagery, vicious creatures and nods to the game, making the landscape a “Silent Hill” and horror fan’s playground. With “Silent Hill: Revelation 3D” due in theaters on October 26th, Bassett took the time to sit down and explain how he put this new nightmare together from picking up where Christophe Gans left off to slipping in Robbie the Rabbit and more. Check out all the details in the interview below and beware, Alessa doesn’t appreciate disturbances.

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Interview: Silent Hill: Revelation 3D’s Kit Harington

Imagine a romantic stroll through a twisted amusement park where you can win bloody rabbit prizes and ride a carousel powered by the Pyramid Head. That’s the date you’re in for should you get together with Kit Harington’s “Silent Hill: Revelation 3D” character, Vincent. Only slightly more appealing than hanging out in the freezing cold surrounded by White Walkers, right?

As the new kid in class, Vincent is friendless so reaches out to Heather (Adelaide Clemens) hoping the newcomers can band together. Constantly on the run with her father (Sean Bean), Heather isn’t in friend-making mode, assuming she’ll pick up and leave again soon enough anyway. However, Vincent is persistent, walks her home and right into her nightmare. Heather’s father has been taken and his captors demand that she come to Silent Hill. The gentleman he is, Vincent insists on escorting her.

With the big return to Silent Hill just days away, Harington took the time to sit down and talk about his progression from “Game of Thrones” to “Silent Hill: Revelation 3D.” We discuss the pressure of managing his character’s backstory, his duty to appease the fans, his love of the horror genre, his hope to finally get to work somewhere warm and more.

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SDCC 2011: Game Of Thrones Panel LIVE

Ballroom 20 is just about packed to the brim, but that shouldn’t come as a surprise because Game of Thrones is on deck to take the stage. Once things kick off, be sure to keep refreshing your browser as I’ll be continually updating the page with the latest information.

It’s just after 3:00pm and here we go. The author of the books, George R.R. Martin takes the stage.

3:06 – First up is a short video presentation sampling what we’ve seen this past season. Emilia Clarke (Daenerys Targaryen) is a fan favorite and gets a nice cheer during her clips. Oddly enough, it’s her on-screen brother, Harry Lloyd’s (Viserys Targaryen) clip that received the bigger reception as the montage feature a certain crown for a king.

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Review: Black Death

A well-made movie isn’t always an enjoyable one, but, then again, not every movie is meant to be enjoyable, per-se. Whatever director Christopher Smith’s exact intentions are for Black Death, what we’ve got is a terrifyingly ominous experience bound to put a knot in your stomach. Smith braves the odds and offers something that denies us the hyped action churned out by the Hollywood machine and aims straight for the darkest, most realistic telling possible, which is bound to earn the admiration of some, but be a bit too much for others to handle.

It’s 1348 and the Black Death is consuming scores of the European population. After sending his lover into the forest to escape the disease, a young monk named Osmund (Eddie Redmayne) asks God to send him a sign to tell him if he should go after her. Shortly after, a Bishop’s envoy, Uric (Sean Bean), arrives in search of a man of God to guide him and his men to a plague–free village in the Great Marsh. It’s obvious to Osmund that this is his chance and regardless of the Father’s final foreboding warning, “even if you survive, the world out there will change you,” Osmund agrees to lead the band of warriors into the forest.

However, once away from the monastery, Uric reveals his true plan; they’re not in search of a safe haven, rather quite the opposite. The village is home to people who’ve renounced God in favor of the devil and amongst them is a necromancer, an individual with the ability to raise the dead. While the warriors gallantly and fearlessly ride into the darkness, Osmund holds on tight to his hope of reuniting with the woman he loves.

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Interview: Black Death Director Christopher Smith

We get a lot of horror movies and a lot of period pieces, but how about a horror period piece? That’s kind of what director Christopher Smith is offering with his new film Black Death. The film takes place in 1348 during the first outbreak of bubonic plague in England. It stars Eddie Redmayne as a monk who leads Ulric (Sean Bean) and his band of warriors to a remote village rumored to have renounced God and house a necromancer, someone with the ability to raise the dead. Not only do the men go to battle with ruthless enemies, but they also must evade the plague.

While Smith is certainly a seasoned horror director, he never makes the same genre film twice. Creep is an eerie mystery, Severance a scary comedy, Triangle a mind-bending nightmare and now there’s Black Death, the horror period piece. Even with his years of experience, the first day on the set of Black Death did rouse concerns of how he’d manage to pull this one off. Yes, the visuals matter in every film, but set design and costumes are pivotal in the case of a historical piece. Throw that into the mix with story development, shooting battle sequences and, well, every other element involved in making a film and Smith really had his hands full.

Lucky for him, not only did he adapt quickly to his timely surroundings, but he had an excellent team of collaborators by his side to contribute as he dove head first in bringing Dario Poloni’s script to life. In honor of the film’s March 11th release, Smith took the time to tell Shockya all about his love of the genre, reworking portions of the story, making the film feel as real as possible, working with his cast and much more. Check it all out in the video interview below.

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Review: Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief

The weight of the world is on Logan Lerman’s shoulders. Not only is he expected to become the next Daniel Radcliff, he literally has to save the planet by keeping the gods from going to war in Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief. Will Lerman save mankind and lead the Percy Jackson team to franchise glory as hoped? You’ll have to see the film to find the answer to the former, but the odds are in his favor in terms of the latter.

Percy Jackson (Lerman) is an average kid. He isn’t the greatest student but finds solace in being in the swimming pool and hanging out with his best friend Grover (Brandon T. Jackson). While his classmates are busy learning about Greek mythology, Percy is thrown directly into it when he finds out that he’s the son of Poseidon (Kevin McKidd). Making matters even more complex, Percy is being blamed for committing the unthinkable, stealing Zeus’ (Sean Bean) coveted lightning bolt. Not only does Percy have to meet Zeus’ deadline for returning the bolt, but he’s also got to evade the forces of Hades (Steve Coogan), who wants the power of the bolt for himself.

Percy ventures off to Camp Half Blood, a training facility for young demigods. There he hones his powers prior to heading out to take care of business. He’s joined by Grover, who happens to be a Satyr assigned to protect Percy, and Annabeth (Alexandra Daddario), the daughter of Athena and a skilled warrior. The trio travels across the country battling Medusa (Uma Thurman), a nasty Hydra and any other evil force that comes their way in order to identify the true lightning thief and return the powerful weapon to its rightful owner.

The only person incapable of enjoying this premise is an individual lacking an imagination. Percy Jackson will appeal to kids and adults alike. Younger audiences will be spellbound by out-of-this-world creatures, mystical powers and charming characters while more mature crowds will take a liking to the famous faces and having the chance to feel like a kid again.

The three main characters are immensely likable. Lerman has a commanding presence with an innate likeability. He successfully makes Percy transition from a vulnerable teenager into a powerful hero. Jackson’s Grover makes for the perfect sidekick. The majorities of his jokes are targeted towards the youngsters in the crowd, but will undeniably evoke a few innocent giggles from older moviegoers. Annabeth is the ultimate female hero. She’s confident, tough and has an unspoken influence over Percy. Unfortunately, she is a rather flat character, but at no fault of Daddario’s. Hopefully if Percy Jackson spawns a sequel, more attention will be payed to unveiling additional layers of Annabeth.

Of the seasoned veterans Coogan makes the biggest impression. Unlike his fellow gods, he ditches the typical Greek garb for something humorously gothic spitting out a few jokes at the outfit’s expense. On the other hand, Uma Thurman’s Medusa is unintentionally comical. The CGI snake hair doesn’t quite work and is more of a caricature.

This is a problem that plagues a number of scenes in the film. Some of the special effects are impressive, particularly Grover and Chiron’s lower bodies, but others don’t seem to have been taken seriously enough. The film has a campy and cartoonish undertone, but some of the CGI takes it a step too far and ends up looking sloppy. The opening scene is particularly hard to digest.

Stylistically, Percy Jackson is very similar to Cirque du Freak: The Vampire’s Assistant. I immensely enjoyed Cirque du Freak, so that’s 110% a compliment. Percy Jackson’s leg up on the vampire film comes from its deeper meaning. Cirque is all fun and games while Percy Jackson has just enough weightiness to make it a good film rather than just a novelty. Percy Jackson is no Harry Potter, but if you let your inner child loose, offers an extraordinary adventure that moviegoers of any age can enjoy.

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