Tag Archives: Scott Glenn

Review: The Bourne Legacy

Why not cut right to the chase? Is “The Bourne Legacy” a worthy start to another “Bourne” trilogy? Yes and no. Should Tony Gilroy get another trio, he’s certainly in good shape as far as the details of this universe go and coming up with exciting and creative action sequences, but we’re going to need access to more of Aaron Cross’ nuances if he’s going to power through as a real person rather than an idealistic secret agent.

We’ve still got the remnants of Treadstone and Blackbriar, but Jason Bourne (Matt Damon) is long gone. After Bourne toppled the CIA’s efforts to produce a team of elite assassins, the agency opts to entirely dismantle the program. And no, that doesn’t mean just laying off the folks involved and sending them on their way; it requires their termination.

Aaron Cross (Jeremy Renner) is one of those people. Similar to Bourne, he’s the product of Operation Outcome, an agent with deadly combat abilities, razor sharp perception and now a target on his back. While out on a solo training mission, Cross gets a taste of just how desperate the CIA is to take him out. While he does escape the attack, Cross is left on the run with a dwindling supply of “chems,” the pills that help him maintain his abilities. That leads him to Dr. Marta Shearing (Rachel Weisz), one of the scientists responsible for monitoring field agents’ health. Trouble is, not only does Marta not have the chems, but she also narrowly escapes an attack of her own. With no one else to turn to, the two team up to hunt down the pills and to outrun the CIA.

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Review: Sucker Punch

High expectations can be a killer. Unfortunately for director Zack Snyder, he works extra hard to insert an insanely high outlook into every single thing that he does and lately, it seems to backfire big time. His brain is geared towards directing and visuals and that doesn’t serve him well as a writer. Whereas the basic concept of Sucker Punch combined with Snyder’s keen eye for the visually incredible had immense prospects, it diluted the script. Spectacular imagery without a sensible and engaging story isn’t a film, it’s a mere spectacle.

After the death of her mother, a series of ill-fated events wrongfully lands Baby Doll (Emily Browning) in the Lennox House for the Mentally Insane. Rather than do what they can to rehabilitate her, the staff accepts a bribe from Baby Doll’s sinister and greedy stepfather to lobotomize her. Just as the doctor’s about to hammer his ice pick through her skull, we’re whisked away to an alternate world, Blue’s (Oscar Isaac) club. That’s where she unites with Sweet Pea (Abbie Cornish), Rocket (Jena Malone), Blondie (Vanessa Hudgens) and Amber (Jamie Chung).

While this may be a step up from the hospital, Blue’s club is still very much a prison. If the girls don’t dance, they serve no purpose and Blue has no trouble eliminating his excess baggage. While at first, Baby Doll can’t seem to get in the groove, once she let’s loose and finally dances, she discovers she has the power to not only mesmerize spectators with her techniques, but transport herself to yet another world. It’s in this new realm that she meets the Wise Man (Scott Glenn) and learns that with the help of the other girls and four objects, they can all escape.

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