Tag Archives: Pierce Brosnan

Cinematical Seven: The 7 Strongest Survivors of ‘Mars Attacks!’

Bust out your Slim Whitman records because the aliens of Mars Attacks! are back. Nine years after the film hit theaters, Warner Home Video is letting us enjoy the absurdity on Blu-ray and now that we’re getting alien invasion movie after alien invasion movie, the genre could use some comedic relief. We get a little of every type of humor in this one from political satire down to dark comedy, all of which are undeniably memorable and still hilarious even after multiple viewings.

However, even though Mars Attacks! is certainly a comedy, many of the main characters meet grizzly ends at the hands of the violent invaders. On top of the on screen casualties, Mars Attacks! also faced a painful destruction at the domestic box office. It opened with just $9.4 million and only went on to make $37.8 million in total. Even with the additional $63.6 million it accumulated overseas, there was no overshadowing the heaps of mixed reviews. Mars Attacks! now stands at a rotten 50% on the Tomatoemeter and a weak, but somewhat respectable 52 on Metacritic.

Mars Attacks! may not have emerged victorious in the eyes of the money-hungry studio folk or the critics, but that’s not to say the stars headlining the film met the same fate – even if they were annihilated in the film. In fact, Mars Attacks! must have taught the cast and thing or two about survival tactics because just about every member has eluded a beating in their careers at some point since that film hit theaters. Check out the most impressive survivors of Mars Attacks! after the jump.

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Review: Remember Me

We can’t expect every movie to be good, but there’s nothing worse than walking out of a theater downright angry. Overall, Remember Me is rather boring, but manages to squeeze in a few powerful moments making it worthwhile. But when a real life tragedy is used as a last ditch effort to evoke emotion, Remember Me transforms into something you’ll be eager to forget.

Edward Cullen, er – Robert Pattinson leads as Tyler, an NYU student who’s undecided – about everything. He adores his young sister, Caroline (Ruby Jerins), but struggles with his father’s (Pierce Brosnan) negligence. Compounding the issue is a recent family tragedy filling Tyler with resentment and rage. During one of his outbursts, a noble effort goes wrong and Tyler assaults a cop (Chris Cooper) earning him and his best pal, Aidan (Tate Ellington), a night in prison. When Aidan sees this cop dropping his daughter (Emilie de Ravin) off at an NYU building, he sees it as an opportunity to seek some revenge. He dares Tyler to approach her and when he does, a harmless gag becomes a budding relationship.

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Robert Pattinson and the Cast of Remember Me

Robert Pattinson’s instantaneous and often overwhelming star power is fantastic for the moment. But what happens when “The Twilight Saga” comes to a close and his herds of adoring fans find another up and comer to fawn over? If Pattinson has anything to do with it, he’ll have moved on from simply being a Hollywood heartthrob and have established himself as a reputable actor. Not only does Remember Me provide him with the opportunity to be remembered long after his claim to fame has come and gone, but it allows him to deliver a similarly important concept to moviegoers: the value of moving on but never forgetting.

Pattinson stars as Tyler, an NYU student struggling with a vast amount of demons he’s not quite sure really exist. It’s fortunate that Pattinson can’t relate to his character in two respects: he didn’t have a troubled youth and that disconnect made the role much more intriguing to tackle. During a roundtable interview he explained, “All the people who I’ve met who are troubled teenagers, you meet their family and their family is like, ‘I don’t know what to do. He’s just – I have no idea what his problem is.'” Tyler definitely has problems to work out, but a recent family tragedy further exacerbates the situation causing him to get unnecessarily heated and even violent.

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Interview: Chris Columbus And The Cast Of Percy Jackson

After having seen Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief, I was somewhat disappointed upon reaching the top of the Empire State building and not finding a doorway to Olympus. I may not have met Zeus, Poseidon and Athena, but I was lucky enough to be in the presence director Chris Columbus and stars Logan Lerman, Brandon T. Jackson, Alexandra Daddario and Pierce Brosnan.

Based on the popular fantasy book by Rick Riordan, The Lightning Thief tells the story of Percy Jackson, an average teenager who finds out he’s the son of Poseidon. After receiving guidance from the wise Centaur Chiron, Percy teams up with his protector Grover and Annabeth, the daughter of Athena, to rescue his mother and identify the individual who stole Zeus’ coveted lightning bolt. The trio goes on a cross-country adventure battling any ungodly creature in their way.

Columbus has the stellar source material and the impressive cast, but the question remains; did he kick off a franchise with the potential to follow in Harry Potter’s footsteps. My hopes are high, but only time will tell. What I can say for sure is that if The Lighting Thief does spawn a film series, Columbus will have a team of humble and hardworking actors in his company.

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Interview: Percy Jackson’s Alexandra Daddario

Since she signed on to play Annabeth, Chase Alexandra Daddario’s world has become as much of a fantasy as the world of Percy Jackson & The Olympians. She was lucky enough to get a role in All My Children back in 2002, but other jobs didn’t come easily. Now, not only does Daddario have a potential franchise at her feet, but she’s being offered other films as well.

In The Lightning Thief, Daddario plays Annabeth, the daughter of Athena and a skilled warrior. She accompanies Percy on his mission to travel to the Underworld and rescue his mother. Check out what Daddario told me about her audition process, how she learned to kick ass Annabeth-style, her hopes for the future and more.

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Review: Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief

The weight of the world is on Logan Lerman’s shoulders. Not only is he expected to become the next Daniel Radcliff, he literally has to save the planet by keeping the gods from going to war in Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief. Will Lerman save mankind and lead the Percy Jackson team to franchise glory as hoped? You’ll have to see the film to find the answer to the former, but the odds are in his favor in terms of the latter.

Percy Jackson (Lerman) is an average kid. He isn’t the greatest student but finds solace in being in the swimming pool and hanging out with his best friend Grover (Brandon T. Jackson). While his classmates are busy learning about Greek mythology, Percy is thrown directly into it when he finds out that he’s the son of Poseidon (Kevin McKidd). Making matters even more complex, Percy is being blamed for committing the unthinkable, stealing Zeus’ (Sean Bean) coveted lightning bolt. Not only does Percy have to meet Zeus’ deadline for returning the bolt, but he’s also got to evade the forces of Hades (Steve Coogan), who wants the power of the bolt for himself.

Percy ventures off to Camp Half Blood, a training facility for young demigods. There he hones his powers prior to heading out to take care of business. He’s joined by Grover, who happens to be a Satyr assigned to protect Percy, and Annabeth (Alexandra Daddario), the daughter of Athena and a skilled warrior. The trio travels across the country battling Medusa (Uma Thurman), a nasty Hydra and any other evil force that comes their way in order to identify the true lightning thief and return the powerful weapon to its rightful owner.

The only person incapable of enjoying this premise is an individual lacking an imagination. Percy Jackson will appeal to kids and adults alike. Younger audiences will be spellbound by out-of-this-world creatures, mystical powers and charming characters while more mature crowds will take a liking to the famous faces and having the chance to feel like a kid again.

The three main characters are immensely likable. Lerman has a commanding presence with an innate likeability. He successfully makes Percy transition from a vulnerable teenager into a powerful hero. Jackson’s Grover makes for the perfect sidekick. The majorities of his jokes are targeted towards the youngsters in the crowd, but will undeniably evoke a few innocent giggles from older moviegoers. Annabeth is the ultimate female hero. She’s confident, tough and has an unspoken influence over Percy. Unfortunately, she is a rather flat character, but at no fault of Daddario’s. Hopefully if Percy Jackson spawns a sequel, more attention will be payed to unveiling additional layers of Annabeth.

Of the seasoned veterans Coogan makes the biggest impression. Unlike his fellow gods, he ditches the typical Greek garb for something humorously gothic spitting out a few jokes at the outfit’s expense. On the other hand, Uma Thurman’s Medusa is unintentionally comical. The CGI snake hair doesn’t quite work and is more of a caricature.

This is a problem that plagues a number of scenes in the film. Some of the special effects are impressive, particularly Grover and Chiron’s lower bodies, but others don’t seem to have been taken seriously enough. The film has a campy and cartoonish undertone, but some of the CGI takes it a step too far and ends up looking sloppy. The opening scene is particularly hard to digest.

Stylistically, Percy Jackson is very similar to Cirque du Freak: The Vampire’s Assistant. I immensely enjoyed Cirque du Freak, so that’s 110% a compliment. Percy Jackson’s leg up on the vampire film comes from its deeper meaning. Cirque is all fun and games while Percy Jackson has just enough weightiness to make it a good film rather than just a novelty. Percy Jackson is no Harry Potter, but if you let your inner child loose, offers an extraordinary adventure that moviegoers of any age can enjoy.

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