Tag Archives: Morris Chestnut

Review: Kick-Ass 2

Kick-Ass_2_Poster1

“Kick-Ass 2” rocks more than enough polished and highly engaging sequences to entice you to overlook its minor identity crisis.

Dave, Mindy, and Chris (Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Chloë Grace Moretz, and Christopher Mintz-Plasse) are back, but now they’re older and have different agendas. Dave is determined to make due on the Kick-Ass hype by teaming up with a league of superheroes to really make a difference. Mindy, on the other hand, is hanging up her wig and weapons to appease Marcus (Morris Chestnut). Since Big Daddy’s passing, Marcus has been her legal guardian and is determined to keep her safe all costs, and Mindy feels obligated to respect that.

Meanwhile, Red Mist is long gone and Chris is busy channeling his rage over his father’s death into his new persona, the villainous Motherf%&*^r. With the help of Javier (John Leguizamo) and his family’s bank account, The Motherf%&*^r assembles the ultimate team of vicious thugs so he can take Kick-Ass out once and for all.

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Review: The Call

The-Call-PosterDirector Brad Anderson and writer Richard D’Ovidio definitely have something here, but “The Call” falls into B-movie territory with a mix of notable highs, but also a handful of rock bottom lows.

Jordan Turner (Halle Berry) is an all-star 911 operator, but when her call with a home invasion victim ends poorly, she feels responsible and opts to step away from the call center. Six months later, Jordan is busy training an incoming class of operators when a call comes in from a young girl who’s been kidnapped. When the operator who receives the call panics, Jordan must put the past behind her, step in and do whatever she can to bring Casey Welson (Abigail Breslin) home alive.

The life of a 911 operator is surprisingly thrilling. The day-to-day happenings as presented in “The Call” are likely far slicker than in reality, but it makes for an ideal central environment for film. We all know and have possibly used a 911 call center, but for those who don’t work in law enforcement, the inner workings of the facility are probably a mystery. D’Ovidio uses the unknown to his advantage, dishing out the bear minimum, satiating curiosity while keeping the information digestible. Anderson and editor Avi Youabian take it from there, turning what could easily have been a stagnant, dull presentation of that call center and giving it life through an appropriate amount of camera movement and some stellar editing. Anderson excels on the opposite end of the spectrum as well with solid action coverage and a number of memorable shots that highlight the true horror of the situation, too.

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