Tag Archives: Max Thieriot

Review: Disconnect

Disconnect-PosterWith a handful of weighty storylines, “Disconnect” can be a lot to digest, but thanks to impeccable transitions, well-calculated story overlap, and a congealing tone, the film doesn’t feel like a sampling of stories, rather a look inside a well-developed world.

“Disconnect” highlights three scenarios, all with connectivity at the core. Kyle (Max Thieriot) is an 18-year-old kid making money by performing on an adult-only website. When journalist Nina Dunham (Andrea Riseborough) stumbles upon his page, she sees his unique story as the ideal expose. Jason (Jason Dixon) and his buddy Frye (Aviad Bernstein) are your typical high school kids, honoring the social ladder and addicted to Facebook. The pair gets a kick out of bullying class loner, Ben Boyd (Jonah Bobo), by creating a fake profile and convincing Ben that a girl has a crush on him. Then there’s Cindy and Derek (Paula Patton and Alexander Skarsgård), a couple targeted by an identity thief eager to exploit their passwords, bank accounts, and deepest secrets.

Director Henry Alex Rubin doesn’t waste a second, pulling you right in using a single shot to follow Kyle through his home. The place is packed with kids who seem fairly typical and in good spirits, but then comes the reveal – the building is actually a teen-driven online porn operation. But still, Kyle clearly feels good about his work and it’s no wonder; he’s particularly nice to look at and quite the charmer. While you’re remorsefully admiring Kyle for being the best of the best, when Nina steps in to offer him a way out, you’re presented with a surprisingly conflicting scenario. Clearly the right thing to do is to help Kyle live a more noble life, but he’s happy and really is being taken care of by his boss. There are glimmers that suggest Kyle isn’t the brightest of the bunch and every now and then Thieriot loses his charm and feels more like a threat, but the chemistry between him and Riseborough is powerful enough throughout that their scenario forces you to juggle all the various potential resolutions at once, hoping both can wind up having what they want while also knowing it’s just not possible.

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‘House at the End of the Street’ Interview: Mark Tonderai on Defying Genre Expectations

Jennifer-Lawrence-Max-Theriot-House-at-the-End-of-the-StreetMaking a horror movie is a double-edged sword. The most hardcore fans of the genre will see anything and everything, so you’re guaranteed to make a buck – but at the same time, many moviegoers have seen just about everything and anything, so it takes quite a bit of ingenuity, creativity and thoughtfulness to wow, let alone scare us, and that’s the challenge director Mark Tonderai strove to tackle with House at the End of the Street. 

Jennifer Lawrence leads as Elissa, a girl who moves into a new house with her mother, Sarah (Elisabeth Shue). Unfortunately, it turns out their dream house has a rather dark past. Just down the street, a young girl viciously murdered her parents and disappeared making her brother, Ryan (Max Thieriot), the only surviving family member. Then again, this isn’t such an unfortunate thing for Elissa because Ryan still calls the former crime scene home and he’s pretty cute, too.

Sounds like your typical innocent-girl-gets-too-close-to-the-creepy-boy movie, right? That’s actually the point. In fact, that’s part of the reason Tonderai was attracted to the project. In honor of House at the End of the Street’s recent DVD and Blu-ray release, Tonderai took the time to explain the meticulous process of turning the expected into the unexpected, delivering a horror thriller with a significant amount of subtext, his experience working with Lawrence, Thieriot and Shue, his reaction to the film’s critical reception and more.

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Review: House at the End of the Street

“Look at that tree. Do you see the face?” “No.” “Look for another three minutes of screen time. Now can you see the face?” “Yes! I see the face.” Two scenes about the face later and I still didn’t see the thing. Thanks “House at the End of the Street” for making me stare at a tree for five minutes for no reason.

One night, young Carrie Ann (Eva Link) brutally murders her parents making her brother, Ryan (Max Thieriot), the sole surviving family member. Four years later, the town still feels the effects of the vicious crime, including the fact that a local murder house drives down property values. Homeowners in the area aren’t happy, but that turns out to be a plus for Sarah (Elisabeth Shue) and her daughter Elissa (Jennifer Lawrence) because they get a gorgeous house on a budget. Sarah’s got no problem living next door to the location of a double homicide until Elissa befriends Ryan. Forever shunned by everyone in town, Elissa feels sorry for Ryan who, to her, seems as though he’s just sad and misunderstood.

Oh, please. The kid’s sister butchers his parents and Ryan’s just sad and misunderstood? Thieriot actually sells it pretty well, but thanks to writer David Loucka’s incessant foreshadowing, you see every twist and turn coming minutes away.

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Interview: The Family Tree’s Dermot Mulroney

We get our fair share of dysfunctional families on the big screen, but very few to the extent of the Burnetts in The Family Tree. Dermot Mulroney stars as the papa bear, Jack. When his wife, Bunnie (Hope Davis), gets knocked out during some naughty and unfaithful role-playing, Jack finds her at the hospital unable to remember anything that happened after they were married. While trying to bring Bunnie up-to-date, Jack also must keep an eye on his gun-loving and borderline religious fanatic of a son, Eric (Max Thieriot), and his daughter, Kelly (Britt Robertson), who’s enjoying exploring her romantic options.

In honor of The Family Tree’s August 26th release in New York and Los Angeles, Mulroney took the time to talk a bit about making the film. With dozens of titles to his name, Mulroney’s experience working on set has undoubtedly changed over the years. Sure, some things are tougher as there tend to be fewer resources to go around, but the additional pressure also keeps the cast and crew on their toes, propelling their effort to bring the audience the best possible final product.

Check out what Mulroney had to say about re-teaming with his good friend Hope Davis, overcoming his past troubles learning the lines, what he’s working on next and much more in the interview below.

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Review: My Soul To Take

Nobody’s perfect, but that doesn’t make it any easier to see a subpar movie from a filmmaker you revere. Even though Pulse and Cursed are clearly weak films, both are still entertaining to a point. Sadly, the only way to get any entertainment out of Wes Craven’s latest film, My Soul to Take, is to see it in a packed theater, that way you can enjoy commiserating with the rest of the audience when you’re hysterically laughing at moments that were never intended to be the least bit funny.

Just before losing his life, the infamous Riverton Ripper vowed to return. Now, sixteen years later, the seven local teens who were born the night the Ripper died begin to lose their lives, one-by-one. The Ripper’s body was never found, so many assume that he’s returned to take care of business. There are also others who believe the Ripper is long gone, but his soul is within one of the Riverton Seven.

Is it the innocent Bug (Max Thieriot)? How about one of Bug’s friends Alex, Jerome or Jake (John Marago, Denzel Whitaker and Jeremy Chu)? Or what about the spiritual Penelope (Zena Grey), the school bully Brandon (Nick Lashaway) or Bug’s crush Brittany (Paulina Cunningham)? Nobody knows for sure, but Bug is clearly the most likely suspect. Not only does he suffer from migraines and terrible nightmares, but Bug has a violent past having barely survived the night his father went on a bloody rampage.

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Interview: My Soul to Take Writer-Director Wes Craven

At just nine-years-old, seeing Scream in theaters back in 1996 was bound to be a profound experience. Of course, the film and the opening sequence in particular, terrified me for quite a while, but rather than scare me away from horror films it drew me in to the genre and especially to the work of Wes Craven. Craven has done just about everything from writing, directing and producing films, to just directing, to just producing to remaking his own work. He even edited some of his movies. He’s an undoubtedly versatile filmmaker and that’s as evident as ever in his latest production, My Soul to Take for which he acted as a triple threat yet again, writing, directing and producing.

On top of assuming multiple positions, Craven puts to use numerous themes in the story. My Soul to Take isn’t just a slasher movie; it’s a psychological thriller as well. It focuses on a character named Bug, a kid who is one of the Riverton Seven. Sixteen years ago the serial killer known as the Riverton Ripper was killed and on that same night, seven children were born, one of which was Bug. Sixteen years later the Ripper himself is assumed to be long gone, but legend has it, his soul exists in one of the seven.

Not only does the combination of the serial killer and the supernatural bring the film a unique texture, but so does the fact that this is Craven’s very first 3D production. Even for a veteran like Craven, there are always new challenges to overcome from developing a multilayered story to casting setbacks to adopting new technology. We were fortunate enough to have some one-on-one time with the man himself during which he provided details on the entire process. Sadly, the fact that Craven is a very seasoned filmmaker also means he knows how to divert spilling Scream 4 secrets, so the chat was strictly My Soul to Take, but nevertheless, made for a great conversation. Enjoy the video interview below.

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Interview: My Soul to Take’s Max Thieriot And Emily Meade

We generally know how it works with horror movies nowadays; studios snatch up lesser-known actors and look forward to reaping the benefits. Whether or not that actor makes it past that movie and moves onto having a stable career is beside the point. However, that’s not nearly the case with My Soul to Take’s Max Thieriot and Emily Meade. Not only have both appeared in a number of films, Thieriot starred in his first feature when he was just 16 and Meade recently appeared in Joel Schumacher’s Twelve. But these two aren’t just in any old horror flick; they’re in a Wes Craven movie.

Thieriot stars as Bug, one of seven kids born on the night the infamous Riverton Ripper died. Rumor has it that the Ripper died, but his soul was passed on to one of the seven. Which one? Nobody knows. Meade comes in as Fang, the toughest high school bully of them all. She’s got an upper hand on just about everyone and takes pride in ordering her minions to administer necessary retribution in the form of physical beat downs. Her favorite victim is Bug. However, that relationship is going to have to change because when the Ripper returns and starts claiming the lives of the Riverton seven one-by-one, they’re forced to rely on each other to survive.

Both Thieriot and Meade participated in a roundtable interview and spilled their guts not only on working on My Soul to Take with Craven, but on their experience with the horror genre dating way back to when they were young and on Thieriot’s upcoming film House at the End of the Street. Check that out and more below and be sure to keep an eye out for our exclusive interview with Craven later this week.

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