Tag Archives: Kyle Gallner

Review: Beautiful Creatures

Beautiful_Creatures_Poster“Warm Bodies” proved that “Twilight” didn’t expire the potential of big screen supernatural romances, but the sub-genre does take a big step back with “Beautiful Creatures.”

Gatlin, South Carolina is home to two kinds of people, the ones that are stupid and the ones that are stuck, and Ethan Wate (Alden Ehrenreich) doesn’t want to be either one of them. But, for the time being, Ethan is involuntarily stuck, stuck in a close-minded religious community living in the past. However, stuck isn’t all that bad once Lena Duchannes (Alice Englert) walks into his life.

Even though Lena is isolated by her classmates courtesy of her vilified lineage, Ethan can’t help but to feel drawn to her. Despite her protests, he wins her over, leaving Lena no choice, but to tell Ethan the truth – she’s not mortal; she’s a caster and on her 16th birthday, her powers will either be claimed for the Dark or the Light, and should they go Dark, Ethan’s life could be at risk.

Click here to read more.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Reviews

Review: Red State

Thanks to a great deal of unusual and somewhat off-putting hype, it’s nearly impossible to go into Red State without any preconceptions. There’s no denying Kevin Smith made some questionable decisions during Red State’s road to the public, but, in the end, how can you judge him when he managed to deliver? On a B-movie level at least.

Travis, Jarod and Billy-Ray (Michael Angarano, Kyle Gallner and Nicholas Braun) are teenage boys and – surprise, surprise – they want to have sex. One tracks down a potential candidate on a website who’s willing to take on all three. The boys seize the opportunity and head out to their mystery woman’s humble abode, a trailer in the woods. Psyched to get down to business, the trio’s caught off guard when they’re drugged and wake up in the clutches of the Five Points Church.

No, this isn’t any old congregation. The members of the Five Points Church are religious fundamentalists willing to do whatever it takes to rid this Earth of those they’re fighting against with a relentless viciousness. Trapped in the church, the boys are forced to watch while Pastor Cooper (Michael Parks) executes a man, leaving the impression that they’re next.

Click here to read more.

Leave a comment

Filed under Reviews

Review: Beautiful Boy

Tackling inherently emotional and real material on the big screen is nearly impossible. No matter how you approach it, there will always be someone to say the situation was misrepresented or sensationalized. While that is the case to a point with Beautiful Boy, the performances are so captivating, it’s possible to push that instinctive judgment aside.

Moody kids call home from college all the time; they’re stressed over an upcoming exam, having trouble with friends or perhaps are just a little homesick. But little did Kate and Bill Carroll (Maria Bello and Michael Sheen) know that when their son, Sam (Kyle Gallner), finally decided to return their calls, he wasn’t just frazzled over typical college pressures. The morning following their phone call, Kate and Bill got word that a crazed gunman struck on Sam’s college campus and that the gunman was their son.

Not only must they mourn the loss of their only child, but fight off news hungry reporters, angry neighbors and Sam’s distraught classmates all while trying to figure out whether this was their fault. Kate’s brother offers to take them in to avoid the news crews camped out on their lawn, but even in the safety of his home, their marital troubles, the presence of Kate’s young nephew and the constant news reports painting their little boy as a heartless murderer consume them.

Click here to read more.

Leave a comment

Filed under Reviews

Interview: Cherry’s Kyle Gallner

Odds are, you know Kyle Gallner for one of the many high profile horror films he’s appeared in over the past few years. There was The Hunting in ConnecticutJennifer’s Body and the highly anticipated reboot, Nightmare on Elm Street, but his success in the genre and the prominence of these films doesn’t mean these are the only types of films Gallner has to offer. In fact, he’s got quite a number of non-horror films on the way, one of which hits theaters this weekend, Cherry.

Cherry stars Gallner as Aaron, a somewhat sheltered guy starting his first year at a prestigious college. He may not be as socially and romantically developed as his roommate, but when it comes to academics, Aaron’s above and beyond his peers. He’s enrolled in an advanced engineering program and while the work should be his top priority, Aaron’s distracted by a woman, a much older woman. Aaron meets Linda in class and the attraction is instant. Problem is, Linda (Laura Allen) has a 14-year-old daughter, Beth (Brittany Robertson), and when Linda brings Aaron over for dinner one night, the attraction between him and Beth is instant as well.

Not only was I thankful to have the opportunity to chat about such a purely enjoyable film, but to an actor on the rise that’s certainly worth keeping an eye on. Check out everything Gallner told me about working on Cherry, working with Kevin Smith on his upcoming film Red State and his hopes for the future in the interview below, and be sure to catch Cherry at the Village East Cinema in New York City.

Click here to read the interview.

1 Comment

Filed under Interviews

Review: Cherry

When you’re doused in big budget, effect-heavy features week after week, it winds up being the simplest productions that really blow you away. Writer-director Jeffrey Fine’s newest film, Cherry, is just about as minimalistic as they come, but the results are huge. Cherry achieves a degree of empathy, entertainment and pleasure that most grander scale films never even come close to earning.

Aaron (Kyle Gallner) always plays by his parents’ rules. From the day he was born, they bred him to become an Ivy League student and the time has finally come for Aaron to pack his things, move into his dorm and begin his freshman year at a prestigious school. He’s there specifically for a top tier engineering program, but is also a talented artist, a skill his parent don’t condone pursuing. He opts to take a drawing class as an elective anyway and that’s where he meets Linda (Laura Allen), a much older student who takes a liking to him. A coffee date leads to a dinner date and that’s when Aaron is sure it’s finally going to be his lucky night. The problem is, not only does he discover Linda has a 14-year-old daughter, Beth (Brittany Robertson), but a cop boyfriend, too.

All hope isn’t lost. Sexual tension still exists between Aaron and Linda, but now there’s some between Aaron and Beth as well. Well, most of that tension comes straight from Beth who’s far beyond her years and has no problem telling everyone exactly what she thinks. Even while being pulled in both directions, Aaron nestles into the family quite nicely, so much so his peers take notice of his absence, he isn’t performing well in class and worst of all, his mother demands to know what’s going on.

Click here to read more.

Leave a comment

Filed under Reviews