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Review: Jobs

Jobs_Poster“Jobs” is an entirely wooden and bland representation of the tech icon, but for Apple devotees, it’ll still have an appeal as an informative biopic.

“Jobs” features Ashton Kutcher as Apple co-founder, Steve Jobs. The narrative hones in on him during his earlier years, shortly after dropping out of Reed College. Later on, while working at Atari, Jobs’ enormous ego earns him a make-or-break assignment he truly can’t handle, so he reconnects with his old friend and computer genius, Steve Wozniak (Josh Gad). After fixing the Atari problem, one of Wozniak’s pet projects catches Jobs’ eye, the beginnings of the personal computer. Through his insatiable dedication to creating the best possible product, Jobs forms Apple Computer alongside Wozniak, a company that ultimately grows to become one of the most profitable in the world.

“Jobs” needs to be assessed from two standpoints – as a film and nothing more, and also as a film for the Apple lover. Steve Jobs does not come across as a particularly likable guy for the majority of the movie, but his ideals clearly made Apple what it is today and, personally, that’s precisely why I’m a dedicated Apple user. Jobs wasn’t out to make devices so they could compete in the market and turn a profit; he wanted Apple computers, iPods, and beyond to be as simple and natural to use as your average kitchen appliance, a model that leads to so much more. For those who are as attached to their laptops, iPhones, and iPads as I am, the devices have become almost like an additional appendage, something that’s integral to getting work done, but also something that offers a release through games, lets you connect with family and friends, and more. Many talk of the dream of being able to disconnect, but personally, I could never imagine such a thing. Regardless of the occasional unwanted e-mail, my Apple products make every day better.

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Review: Warrior

It’s tough for a sports movie to keep out of cliché territory. No matter what, if the main player pulls through and wins big, you can’t help but to mumble, “Yeah, right.” While Warrior isn’t devoid of that concept as it’s almost intrinsic to the genre, the piece achieves an exceptional degree of realism. Yes, The Fighter is the one that’s based on the true story, but between the two, Warrior not only feels more authentic, but it’s a slightly more enjoyable watch, too.

After 14 years, Tommy Conlon (Tom Hardy) heads home to what’s left of his broken family. A former star wrestler, Tommy decides to enter Sparta, a tournament described as the Super Bowl of mixed martial arts fighting. Incapable of putting their tumultuous past behind them, Tommy asks his father, Paddy (Nick Nolte), proudly sober 1,000 days, to train him again, but only under the condition that Paddy keep the relationship business only and never touch on Tommy’s experience living with his now deceased mother or his time in the Marines.

Meanwhile, Tommy’s estranged brother, Brendan (Joel Edgerton), is a family man and high school teacher. While he loves his job and students, teaching physics just isn’t bringing in enough to support his wife (Jennifer Morrison) and two little girls, so Brendan resorts to an old skill to make some extra cash, MMA. When the school principal (Kevin Dunn) finds out about Brendan’s moonlighting, he deems the behavior unacceptable, reports Brendan to the superintendent who suspends him without pay. Now that fighting is his only way to keep his family afloat, Brendan turns to an old trainer buddy, Frank (Frank Grillo), who agrees to lend a hand and help get Brendan back in fighting form. However, when Frank’s #1 fighter suffers an injury, he needs to send a replacement to Sparta and, after a bit of pleading, decides to give Brendan a shot.

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