Tag Archives: Juno Temple

Review: Maleficent

Maleficent_PosterAngelina Jolie playing Maleficent has loads of potential, but that alone can’t support a movie.

This is “Sleeping Beauty” from Maleficent’s perspective. As a young fairy living in The Moors, Maleficent meets a human boy named Stefan (Sharlto Copley). As they get older, they remain friends until Stefan decides he’s really a power-hungry wannabe king and betrays Maleficent in exchange for the crown. When Stefan’s daughter Aurora (Elle Fanning) is born, Maleficent retaliates by putting a curse on the newborn, one that will have her slip into a deep sleep on her 16th birthday.

However, the story is secondary because prime importance is placed on the fact that Jolie dressing up as a Disney villain will draw a crowd. Minus the light 97-minute running time, there isn’t a single redeeming quality to “Maleficent.” It’s a harsh assessment, but when you’ve got such a talented visual effects artist at the helm, iconic source material, an all-star cast and a hefty studio-sized budget to back it all up, there’s just no excuse to deliver such a lazy film.

Click here to read more.

Leave a comment

Filed under Reviews

Screen Rant’s 10 Most Anticipated Horror Movies of 2013

Horror-Movie-Preivew-2013Ready for a year of straight slasher flicks, horror anthologies, paranormal entities, home invasions, and more? 2013 is due to cover just about every corner of the horror genre – including remakes, adaptations, and even a few original ideas, too.

There’s dozens of prospective nightmare-inducing productions on the way (or already in theaters), but we’ve narrowed it down to the 10 that pack the most promising source material, stellar teams of talent, innovative core concepts and/or the potential for unprecedented carnage.

Check out our 10 Most Anticipated Horror Movies of 2013.

Click here to read more.

Leave a comment

Filed under Features

Interview: Dirty Girl’s Jeremy Dozier

Juno Temple, Milla Jovovich, Mary Steenburgen, Dwight Yoakam, William H. Macy, Tim McGraw – and Jeremy Dozier? Unlike his Dirty Girl co-cast, odds are, you’ve got no clue who Dozier is. Well, there’s a good reason his name is amongst this list of top notch talent and, soon enough, he could be up there himself.

Dozier is Dirty Girl‘s Clarke, an introverted high school outcast who’s also picked on at home, as his father has no tolerance for Clarke’s sexual preferences. When Clarke’s paired up with school slut Danielle (Juno Temple) for a class project, he’s forced to play daddy to a bag of flour that they’re assigned to treat as a child. However, their baby bag of flour doesn’t spend her days riding the bus to school or sitting alongside her teen parents in class, rather in a stolen car on an impromptu road trip. Danielle, desperate to find her real father, and Clarke, hoping to find himself, hit the road in Clarke’s father’s precious ride with his credit card aiming for Los Angeles.

Sure, I’d like to bet his singing and dancing abilities might have had something to do with Dozier snagging the role, but, more prominently, Dozier rocks the ability to handle one heck of a character arc, which is quite the accomplishment for his first feature. Clarke’s a character that you won’t forget and hopefully the same will be true for Dozier.

With the October 7th release of Dirty Girl on the horizon, Dozier sat down to chat all about the experience from the audition stage to hitting the set with such notable talent to his hopes for the future. Check out the whole chat in the video interview below.

Click here to watch the interview.

Leave a comment

Filed under Interviews

Review: Dirty Girl

Sure it’s nice to get a movie that truly moves you and leaves you with a little something to take home after the credits roll, but don’t you ever want to go to the theater and just have some fun? Well, if that’s on your agenda, Dirty Girl is worth a look. And while it doesn’t transcend that barrier into the territory of the truly deep and meaningful, it does have a relatively impressive degree of emotion to offer.

Danielle (Juno Temple) is promiscuous and proud of it. When some bad behavior lands her in the “challenged” class, she’s forced to team up with her gay, hyper-quiet classmate, Clarke (Jeremy Dozier), and play mom and dad to a bag of flower they dub Joan, him for Crawford and her for Jett. While neither Danielle nor Clarke feel the need to play nice initially, when they each get a peek into the other’s tumultuous home life, they come to realize they’ve got a lot in common and can actually help each other.

With her mother (Milla Jovovich) about to marry a straightedge Mormon man (William H. Macy), Danielle begs Clarke to highjack his father’s care so they can drive to Los Angeles so she can find her birth father (Tim McGraw). At first Clarke refuses, but when his father (Dwight Yoakam) finds some of his naughty paraphernalia, Clarke has no choice: he’s got to get out of there. And so Danielle and Clarke hit the road with Joan in tow, having a blast while free of their restrictive parents, but actually learning quite a bit about family along the way.

Click here to read more.

Leave a comment

Filed under Reviews

9 Big-Screen Bad Girls You Love To Hate

Who doesn’t love a big-screen bad girl?

On October 7th, Juno Temple hits the big screen as Danielle in Dirty Girl, a sassy teen growing up in Oklahoma and a self-proclaimed whore. Living up to her bad reputation, Danielle convinces another school outcast Clarke (Jeremy Dozier) to steal his father’s car with which the two make a mad dash to Los Angeles so Clarke can escape the ridicule and she can find her father.

Most prefer to steer clear of firebrands like Danielle in real life, but on film they can be some of the most colorful people to spend time with. While Temple’s character isn’t nearly as ruthless and mean-spirited as some of these ladies, Dirty Girl is certainly an excellent excuse to look back at some awesome big-screen female baddies.

Click here to read more.

Leave a comment

Filed under Features

Review: Cracks

Filmmaking is certainly a collaborative effort and while that may be an asset in many ways, in some cases, it can also sink even the most beautiful and promising ship. Director Jordan Scott deservedly follows in the footsteps of her father, Ridley, while Juno Temple and Eva Green deliver unforgettably striking performances. If only it weren’t for that damn script.

At an all-girls British boarding school, Di (Temple) and the other members of Miss G’s (Green) diving team sit at the top of the social ladder. The girls follow their beloved instructor like puppy dogs, soaking in every word she says and doing everything and anything to impress her. While some find success in their efforts, it’s Di who is and will always be the shining star in Miss G’s eyes – or so she thinks.

When a new girl named Fiamma (Maria Valverde) arrives, not only is Miss G blown away by her diving ability, but by every facet of this gorgeous and unique Spanish specimen. Unlike her other students, Fiamma unenthusiastically obeys her teacher, which only draws Miss G in more. As Di sees her status as Miss G’s favorite waning, she takes her frustration out on Fiamma, enticing the other girls to join her in bullying the newcomer. Sure enough, bullying doesn’t solve anything, rather intensifies the situation on all fronts.

Click here to read more.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Reviews

Interview: Cracks’ Eva Green

Think you know Eva Green from The Golden Compass or maybe Casino Royale? Think again. Actually, if you’re a fan of the show Camelot, you might already have a sense of what Green is capable of. As she put it herself in an interview with Collider, her character isn’t evil, “I see her more as damaged,” and that idea of misinterpreted malevolence is certainly present in Green’s latest film, Cracks.

Green plays Miss G, a teacher and diving coach at an all-girls boarding school. She is so close to the girls on her team, she practically becomes like a mother to them – or maybe a sister – or perhaps a friend. That’s exactly Miss G’s problem; she has a hard time figuring out how close is too close, and when she’s pushing the limits when it comes imparting her own philosophies on the girls. When she gets a new recruit, a young Spanish girl named Fiamma (Maria Valverde), Miss G’s boundaries crumble entirely and the results are devastating.

This role would certainly be a challenge for any actress, but director Jordan Scott was confident enough in her abilities to forgo the audition process and go straight for Green. Still, being able to bring Miss G to life was going to take a lot of time and energy from every front – rehearsals, hair and makeup, wardrobe and more. In honor of the film’s March 18th release, Green sat down to tell us all about inhabiting Miss G’s twisted mind. Check it all out in the video interview below.

Click here to watch the interview.

Leave a comment

Filed under Interviews

Interview: Cracks Director Jordan Scott

When your father is Ridley Scott, directing has to be in your blood, right? Well, Scott certainly passed on some of that passion because not only is his son, Jake, busy making his own features, most recently Welcome to the Rileys, but now his daughter, Jordan, is trying to make her mark on the industry too with her very first feature Cracks.

The film focuses on a group of girls at the top of the social ladder at an all-girls boarding school. Under the guidance of their beloved Miss G (Eva Green), Di (Juno Temple), Poppy (Imogen Poots) and the rest of the clique train hard to improve their diving skills, learn what they can about Miss G’s philosophies of life and do what’s necessary to maintain their rank amongst their peers. When a new student arrives, Fiamma (Maria Valverde), their perfect existence is entirely distorted, Fiamma not only consuming Miss G’s attention, but her affection, too.

Moving from the world of shorts to tackling a feature is no simple task and Scott certainly didn’t make it any easier on herself opting for a story that was not only a period piece, but something that’s multilayered with every layer expressing a different tone. However, Scott had a vision and knew what she wanted and that help propel her through this much more time consuming filmmaking experience. Just this morning Scott sat down to tell us all about the entire process from turning the original novel into a screenplay to working with her stars and more. See it all for yourself in the video interview below.

Click here to watch the interview.

Leave a comment

Filed under Interviews