Tag Archives: Joel Schumacher

SDCC 2012: Batmobiles Through The Years

Just before heading into The Hilton Bayfront for the “Twilight” press conference, I spent a few minutes with six truly wicked rides. You’d think seeing the Tumbler and Bruce Wayne’s other whips merely parked on the grass rather than zipping around Gotham City would be a bit of a drag, but these things are just as incredible stagnant, in the flesh.

Check out some photos as well as official descriptions of the collection below.

Adam West’s 1955 Lincoln Futura. Designed by George Barris, this original Batmobile was featured in the cult classic television series and 1966?s Batman, the Movie.

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Interview: My Soul to Take’s Max Thieriot And Emily Meade

We generally know how it works with horror movies nowadays; studios snatch up lesser-known actors and look forward to reaping the benefits. Whether or not that actor makes it past that movie and moves onto having a stable career is beside the point. However, that’s not nearly the case with My Soul to Take’s Max Thieriot and Emily Meade. Not only have both appeared in a number of films, Thieriot starred in his first feature when he was just 16 and Meade recently appeared in Joel Schumacher’s Twelve. But these two aren’t just in any old horror flick; they’re in a Wes Craven movie.

Thieriot stars as Bug, one of seven kids born on the night the infamous Riverton Ripper died. Rumor has it that the Ripper died, but his soul was passed on to one of the seven. Which one? Nobody knows. Meade comes in as Fang, the toughest high school bully of them all. She’s got an upper hand on just about everyone and takes pride in ordering her minions to administer necessary retribution in the form of physical beat downs. Her favorite victim is Bug. However, that relationship is going to have to change because when the Ripper returns and starts claiming the lives of the Riverton seven one-by-one, they’re forced to rely on each other to survive.

Both Thieriot and Meade participated in a roundtable interview and spilled their guts not only on working on My Soul to Take with Craven, but on their experience with the horror genre dating way back to when they were young and on Thieriot’s upcoming film House at the End of the Street. Check that out and more below and be sure to keep an eye out for our exclusive interview with Craven later this week.

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Review: Twelve

The grand finale of Nick McDonell’s book Twelve is one of the most powerful and successful buildups I’ve ever experienced. After an entire story of fairly tranquil moments, McDonell absolutely blows the reader away with an astonishingly gripping conclusion. However, director Joel Schumacher doesn’t come anywhere close to creating as much suspense in his film adaptation, rendering a grand finale that packed such an intense punch on the page ineffective. The film version of Twelve is quite the opposite of the book, a dull and thoughtless ride with a sad excuse for a climax.

There’s really no eloquent way of describing the plot, so let’s approach this character-by-character. At the center of the story is White Mike (Chace Crawford), a good guy turned drug dealer after the passing of his mother. Chris (Rory Culkin) is the kid with a house prime for parties. He just threw one on Friday, but when the school hottie, Sara Ludlow (Esti Ginzburg), asks him to host her 18th birthday party, he obliges. Mark Rothko (Charlie Saxton) and his buddy Timmy (Erik Per Sullivan) are always hounding White Mike for drugs. They’re overbearing, but harmless. The same goes for White Mike’s cousin Charlie (Jeremy Allen White), but when he puts his gun in the wrong guy’s face, White Mike’s drug supplier, Lionel (50 Cent), he winds up getting himself, his friend Hunter (Philip Ettinger) and a kid Hunter plays basketball with, Nana (Jermaine Crawford), into some serious trouble.

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Cinematical Seven: Seven Things Wrong With ‘Twelve’

Very few films are as good as the book, but that still doesn’t excuse an absolute travesty of a book-to-film adaptation. The unfortunate thing is Twelve had such unbelievable on screen potential. Not only is the subject matter widely appealing — pretty people doing bad things — but it has a stellar cast to go with it. All directorJoel Schumacher had to do was follow the story, trim a little fat and he would have ended up with a solid production. But he and screenwriter Jordan Melamed just went about it all wrong, making Twelve an extended episode of Gossip Girl rather than a dark and foreboding tale.

The film stars Chace Crawford as White Mike, a smart kid who resorts to a life of seclusion and drug dealing after losing his mother to cancer. His clients include just about anyone who hangs out at Chris’ (Rory Culkin) house, where all the best parties are held. In fact, this weekend, the most popular girl at school, Sara Ludlow (Esti Ginzburg), wants to have her birthday party at Chris’, and considering Chris and every other guy at school — or in the entire city for that matter — would do just about anything to be with Sara, he agrees to play host. The newest number to appear on White Mike’s phone is that of Jessica (Emily Meade), a promising student who winds up getting hooked on the newest drug on the market, Twelve. White Mike doesn’t deal Twelve, but she’ll do just about anything for it, even if it means going to White Mike’s supplier, Lionel (50 Cent).

There’s so much more to it than that, but I implore you to get the information from Nick McDonell’s book rather than the film, or at least read the book before seeing the movie. Twelve is by far one of the most compelling pieces I’ve ever read and it pains me to say that the film is just the opposite. I walked out of the theater so utterly disappointed I felt as though I could almost pull a Claude (Billy Magnussen). Okay, that’s extreme, but I was pretty angry. Unlike Claude, I’ve opted to channel my anger into a Cinematical Seven, so enjoy and thank you for tolerating my need to vent.

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