Tag Archives: Glynn Turman

Interview: John Dies at the End’s Don Coscarelli and Paul Giamatti

Paul_Giamatti_Don_Coscarelli_John_Dies_at_the_EndDavid Wong’s book warns, “STOP. You should not have touched this book. NO, don’t put it down. It’s too late.” Too bad Don Coscarelli’s feature film adaptation of “John Dies at the End” isn’t branded with the same advice because once you get sucked into his world of soy sauce, meat monsters and Korrok, there’s no turning back.

Straight from Wong’s book, Coscarelli’s film features Chase Williamson as David Wong, a harmless college dropout consumed by the effects of a drug known as soy sauce. The thing is, Dave wasn’t even looking to get high. He thought his buddy, John (Rob Mayes), overdosed on the black stuff, so he was just being a good friend by taking John to the hospital along with the needle he injected himself with. Trouble is, Dave puts the thing in his pocket, accidently sticking himself. From that point on, he’s got no choice, but to play along, using bratwurst phones and battling otherworldly creatures if he’s going to save the world. Paul Giamatti steps in as Arnie, a reporter who arrives after all the insanity goes down and is tasked with putting together the details of David’s seemingly bogus adventure.

With “John Dies at the End” due for a theatrical release on January 25th, Coscarelli and Giamatti sat down for a roundtable interview to discuss the meat of the film (no pun intended), the current state of the horror genre, where “John Dies at the End” fits in and more. Check out all the highlights from the interview in the video below.

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Review: John Dies at the End

John_Dies_at_the_End_Poster“John Dies at the End” shouldn’t be a good movie. The narrative is just way too off the rails, there’s nearly no reasoning behind most of the plot points and the large majority of the visual effects are rather rough, but the power of smart and deeply dedicated filmmaking takes over and writer-director Don Coscarelli manages to lead his cast and crew through to an undeniably entertaining end product.

David Wong (Chase Williamson) is far from a golden boy, but he’s your pretty average slacker – that is until he comes in contact with “the sauce.” One night David and his buddy John (Rob Mayes) go to a party. John’s rocking out with his band while David’s moseying around, drinking his beer. He spots a jerk named Justin White (Johnny Weston) teasing Amy Sullivan (Fabianne Therese) about her prosthetic hand, and after rescuing said prosthetic hand, Amy tells David her dog bit some Jamaican guy and ran off. David tracks down the Jamaican guy who gives David the creeps by reading a recent dream and making him puke up a living bug. That’s enough for one night; David calls it quits, heads home and crashes.

Later that night, David’s awoken by a frantic call from John so he heads over to his place to check on him. Sure enough, John’s off his mind, running around his trashed apartment in his underwear. David tracks down the culprit, a syringe filled with a black liquid, and takes it and his deranged friend to the hospital. Trouble is, that black liquid’s got a mind of its own and David doesn’t make it very far before feeling the effects of the soy sauce himself.

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Interview: John Dies At The End Writer-Director-Producer Don Coscarelli

John_Dies_at_the_End_PosterMeat monsters, flying moustaches, chest-sucking slugs and bratwursts that function as cell phones. Think all that’s a challenge to sell on the big screen? Director Don Coscarelli takes it one step further aiming to do just that within a non-linear narrative in his adaptation of David Wong’s off the wall, time-traveling novel, “John Dies at the End.”

The film stars Chase Williamson as Dave, a guy who goes from living the typical lazy slacker life to battling supernatural creatures and traveling to other worlds via a new drug known as soy sauce. In his attempt to rush his buddy John (Rob Mayes) to the hospital after indulging in a bit too much of the black stuff, David gets stuck with the needle himself, letting the sauce loose in his system, heightening his senses to a superhuman extent and making him the centerpiece of an epic battle to save the planet.

Think that sampling of “John Dies at the End” sounds a little off the rails? Just wait until you catch the full feature. The movie is currently available On Demand, but in honor of its January 25th theatrical release, Coscarelli sat down to talk soy sauce and all of its outrageous side effects. Check out what Coscarelli had to say about honing his narrative, finding the right actors to strike the perfect tone, the plan to manufacture meat monsters and more in the video interview below.

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Review: Super 8

After months of mysterious and intriguing promotions, forming preconceptions about Super 8 is inevitable. Now that it’s finally arrived, the question is, does it make due on those expectations? Yes and no and that ambiguity is what makes this film so special and effective. Writer, director and producer J.J. Abrams, knows how to build hype and has no trouble handling it thereafter. Super 8 is what we’ve hoped for, but also so much more.

It’s 1979 in the small town of Lillian, Ohio, and Joe Lamb (Joel Courtney) and his friends are in the midst of a big production, a zombie film. With Joe on makeup duty, Carey (Ryan Lee) handling the fiery special effects, Preston (Zach Mills) stepping in as a background actor, Martin (Gabriel Basso) playing the detective and Charles (Riley Griffiths) behind the lens, all the boys are missing is their lead actress. That’s where Alice (Elle Fanning) steps in. The group hits the road and heads to the local train station where Charles sees an oncoming train as a timely “production value.” Well, that is until it crashes, kicking off a chain of events involving a complete army takeover of Lillian.

Joe’s dad, Jackson (Kyle Chandler), the town deputy, is forced to deal with the repercussions himself as the accident triggers a series of strange occurrences including missing dogs, appliances and people that send the town into a panic. With no valid explanation, Jackson must investigate himself all while dodging the intrusive and brutal tactics of Colonel Nelec (Noah Emmerich). Meanwhile, Joe and his friends attempt to finish their zombie film with the train crash site and army presence as yet another “production value.” However, those values ultimately lead them straight into an incredibly phenomenal and dangerous situation.

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