Tag Archives: Garrett Hedlund

NYFF 2013 Review: Inside Llewyn Davis

Inside_Llewyn_Davis_Poster1“Inside Llewyn Davis” features a remarkable lead performance and impassioned journey, but the character’s destructive habits and off-putting attitude can make the experience deflating and unfulfilling.

The film covers a week in the life of struggling singer, Llewyn Davis (Oscar Isaac). While trying to make a name for himself in the Greenwich Village folk scene, Llewyn drags his bag and guitar around, crashes on friends’ couches, ruins some of those relationships with his sour attitude and then, when all seems lost, heads to Chicago for a long overdue meeting with a media mogul who doesn’t even know he exists.

“Inside Llewyn Davis” is brimming with quality material, but Llewyn’s bleak existence and unpleasant demeanor makes it difficult to enjoy the experience. The guy is just a self-centered jerk. Not only does he suck all of his friends dry by invading their space, but then, while he’s there, he rarely manages a thank you because he’s totally consumed by his own agenda.

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‘The Hunger Games’ Countdown: The Finnick Frenzy and Fandom’s ‘Hunger Games’ Awards

In Hunger Games: Catching Fire news, the District 4 victor, Finnick Odair, is certainly in the spotlight. As expected, now that we’re inching closer to shoot time, casting is underway and as one of the sequel’s most prominent new roles, not to mention a fan favorite, Finnick news and rumors are cropping up all over the place. However, rather than force you to run through blocks of text, check out this handy graphic detailing the Finnick frenzy thus far.

Now the big question is, what can we take from all of this? While I’d like to bet every single one of the actors mentioned above is in consideration for the role, being “in consideration” can mean a lot of things from perhaps being director Francis Lawrence’s top choice to merely having your name mentioned during a meeting. However, we did go through a very similar process with Katniss, Peeta, Gale and more last year and, in the end, all of the roles did come down to a name prominent during rumor time. Should Garrett Hedlund, Armie Hammer or one of the others snag the role fairly soon, despite what producer Nina Jacobson told theLA Times, I wouldn’t be surprised, but I’m still pulling for Hammer.

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Review: TRON: Legacy

As a sequel to a film made in 1982 with a premise that lends itself to be visually and mentally stimulating, TRON: Legacy was guaranteed to be a spectacle. First time feature director Joseph Kosinski certainly makes due on that expectation, but not much else. Looks may not be everything, but in the case of TRON: Legacy, they’re enough to keep you entertained for almost all of the film’s 125 minutes, but beyond that, the only possible way the film will have resonance is through the Daft Punk soundtrack.

When we last left Kevin Flynn (Jeff Bridges) in the 1982 film TRON, he’d emerged from the grid and taken over Encom from Ed Dillinger, finally getting him back for when Dillinger stole Flynn’s video game code and called it his own. TRON: Legacy kicks off in 1989. Flynn’s wife passed away, he’s now a single parent to their young son Sam (Owen Best) and Flynn’s strange behavior is creating concern at Encom. Flynn regularly leaves Sam with his grandparents while he works late, but one night, Flynn never returns. Twenty years later, Sam (Garrett Hedlund) is 27 and still without a father. After receiving a mysterious page from the phone in his father’s old office, Sam heads over to Flynn’s Arcade to investigate. He sits down at his father’s computer to see what he’d been working on and, much like Flynn over 25 years ago, winds up being transported to the grid.

With no knowledge of where he is, Sam gets a quick wardrobe makeover and is tossed into the games where he must play to the death, or in this world’s case, to the derez. That’s where Sam meets Clu (Bridges), a program created in his father’s image. Flynn originally instructed Clu to create the perfect system, but Clu wound up usurping his maker and building a dictatorship. Before Clu can kill Sam in the games, Quorra (Olivia Wilde) comes to the rescue, saving Sam and bringing him to his real father who’s been trapped in the grid all this time. Together they must defeat Clu before he can gather the intelligence that would allow his army to invade the real world.

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Defending Bad Movies: Georgia Rule

Regardless of whether or not you think she deserves what she’s getting, Lindsay Lohan must be feeling pretty rotten these days and I can’t help but to feel a little sympathetic, even if it’s just the slightest bit. So, in honor of Lohan’s downfall, while everyone else is knocking the once promising actress, I’m going to give her a little credit. In fact, I’ll do so for a film that not only marked the starting point of her demise, but one that got universally panned as well, Georgia Rule.

The film stars Lohan as Rachel Wilcox, a rotten city kid who’s sent to spend the summer with her grandmother, Georgia (Jane Fonda), in hopes it’ll straighten her out. Rachel’s mother, Lilly (Felicity Huffman), may let her get away with misbehaving at home, but at Georgia’s Idaho abode, things are different and Rachel must abide by “Georgia Rule.” When Rachel isn’t getting her mouth washed out with soap, she’s either working at the vet Simon’s (Dermot Mulroney) office or trying to corrupt the local golden boy Harlan (Garrett Hedlund). Rachel manages to squeeze by committing only a handful of atrocities until one of her stories takes things a bit too far. When Rachel tells Simon her mother’s boyfriend molested her, he tells Georgia who tells Rachel’s mother who returns to Idaho to straighten things out during which the harbored frustrations between three generations boil over.

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