Tag Archives: Ezra Miller

Review: The Perks of Being a Wallflower

While I’ve still yet to give it a read, apparently “The Perks of Being a Wallflower” has roots in some excellent source material. Sure, seeing the movie before reading the book takes away the opportunity to imagine the characters as I perceive them, but the casting for this film is so pitch perfect, there’s no one I’d rather spend more time with than Logan Lerman’s Charlie, Ezra Miller’s Patrick and Emma Watson’s Sam.

Life isn’t easy for Charlie. Not only does he have a rather dark past, but he’s starting high school and doesn’t have a single friend there. However, one night at a football game, on a whim, Charlie approaches Patrick, a senior from his woodshop class with a tendency to cause trouble, as he makes no effort to restrain his big personality. Patrick introduces Charlie to his stepsister, Sam, and the two immediately take a liking to him, bringing Charlie into their circle of friends and finally making him feel accepted.

“The Perks of Being a Wallflower” is oozing with high school clichés and has quite a bit of tacky dialogue, but, for the most part, it works in the film’s favor. The innocence of the material matches Charlie’s naivety and the combination creates this overwhelmingly sweet and seemingly harmless environment. However, then drugs, alcohol and some really disturbing scenarios juxtapose that innocence, making “Perks” much more than any other face value high school drama.

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Interview: Beware The Gonzo’s Ezra Miller and Zoe Kravitz

It’s been just over a year since Beware the Gonzo charmed audiences at the Tribeca Film Festival and it’s no wonder that both Ezra Miller and Zoë Kravitz have been busy ever since. In the movie Miller stars as Gonzo, a high school kid with some intense ambitions. When the school golden boy, Riley (Jesse McCartney), uses his power as the paper’s editor-in-chief to stifle Gonzo’s creativity and zest, Gonzo opts to start his own paper, one outside the school’s jurisdiction (to a point): The Gonzo Files. Also with a vendetta against Riley, Kravitz’s character, Evie, opts to join the ranks of The Gonzo Files and fight back by doing whatever it takes to bring the student body the truth.

After speaking with Miller and Kravitz, it’s quite clear as to why director Bryan Goluboff added them to his roster; they’re both incredibly passionate and are willing to fight for what they want. We talked about Beware the Gonzo quite a bit, but the conversation also trailed off into real-life territory and their struggle trying to make it in a business with a preference for casting 20-somethings as high school teens. From my standpoint, Miller and Kravitz appear to have thriving careers, but both admit to have experienced some troubling times along the way and, quite naturally, concern for the future.

At the same time, these are two very fun-loving people we’re talking about and the giggles were abound in this interview. To level the playing field, I opted to leave in a little cell phone oops on my part, as I’m hoping you’ll get as good of a laugh out of it as we did. Check it all out for yourself in the video interview below and be sure to catch Beware the Gonzo when it hits theaters on September 9th.

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Tribeca Interview: Every Day’s Richard Levine

Superheroes, maniacal serial killers and historical figures brought back to life are great, but sometimes you just need a good old family drama that feels real and Every Day is just that. Our family of four, played by Liev Schreiber, Helen Hunt, Ezra Miller and Skyler Fortgang, take on a hefty load when grandpa Ernie (Brian Dennehy) comes to live with them. That’s on top of routine troubles, like work frustrations and struggles with sexual identity, all of which send the clan into an amusing and often touching period of confusion and frustration.

You’d never think this type of story would come from the pen of Nip/Tuck writer Richard Levine. Levine does away with the profound happenings at the plastic surgery practice and adopts a far more true-to-life tone. In fact, Every Day is somewhat true-to-life in Levine’s case; much of the piece evolved from his experience with his own family.

While promoting his film at the Tribeca Film Festival, Levine took the time to elaborate on the film’s connection with his personal life as well as the casting process, an unusual method of rehearsal as well as his upcoming ABC show, Scoundrels. Take a look at what he had to say below.

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Tribeca Review: Every Day

Writer Richard Levine’s entire resume consists of work on the small screen, most notably on Nip/Tuck, so it’s no surprise that his first feature film plays out much like a TV show. The unusual thing is that Every Day is as ordinary as they come, whereas Nip/Tuck is far from it. Every Day may be a low-key film about an average family dealing with average problems, but Levine’s more twisted side is still evident; its brainchildren are just kept as theoretical concepts rather than visual ones.

Ned and Jeannie (Liev Schreiber and Helen Hunt) live in a nice home with their two sons Jonah and Ethan (Ezra Miller and Skyler Fortgang). Like just about any family, they’re seemingly happy, but have some issues. Ned writes for a television show and his more restrained ideas clash with his boss’ demand for concepts with extreme shock value. Jeannie is forced to ditch her career when she winds up taking care of her sickly father in addition to her two boys. Making matters worse, her father, Ernie (Brian Dennehy), is a bit of a handful and anything but thankful. Then there are the kids; Jonah has known he’s gay since he was 12, but his father is still having a hard time accepting it. Meanwhile, Ethan is on the paranoid side constantly questioning his folks about the potential of home invaders and if his grandfather will walk into the light soon.

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