Tag Archives: Eddie Redmayne

‘Les Misérables’ Director and Cast Talk Snot, Tattoos & Singing Live

Les-MiserablesApparently, constantly being asked, “You do understand that a movie musical is something you could really fall flat on your face doing?,” was all the motivation director Tom Hooper needed, because he pulled it off; he made a film version of the much-beloved Les Misérables and it’ll likely go on to earn a number of award nods, if not wins.

While participating in press conferences in New York City, Hooper admits, “They were right about the risks.” He explains, “When I made The King’s Speech, no one had heard of The King’s Speech.” Hooper was able to make that film in total privacy and, clearly, that wasn’t the case when adapting a piece people all across the globe hold so near and dear. “I felt very aware of the fact that so many millions of people hold this close to their heart and will probably sit in the cinema in complete fear that we would f*** it up.”

However, Eric Fellner of Working Title, is quick to point out, “If we only appeal to the fans, then, with a budget like this, the film wouldn’t work, so it was really critical that we made a film that had the DNA of the show and worked absolutely for the fans – but also had the potential to break out and create a whole new audience for Les Misérables.”

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Review: Les Misérables

Les-Miserables-PosterI never cared much for “Les Misérables” back when every other girl in my class had to sing “Castle on a Cloud” at the school talent show and, it turns out, I don’t care all that much for it in movie form either, even when it’s an immensely impressive production.

In case you’re like me and never bothered to see the musical or read the book, “Les Misérables” focuses on Jean Valjean (Hugh Jackman), a man enslaved for 19 years for stealing a loaf of bread to feed his starving nephew. After finally being released, Valjean violates his parole to start anew. Even though he really does turn over a new leaf, running an honest business and doing good whenever he can, the über by-the-book policeman, Javert (Russell Crowe), is determined to make Valjean pay.

Still, nothing stops Valjean from being a good man. As Fantine’s (Anne Hathaway) life spins out of control, Valjean comes to her aid, agreeing to care for her young daughter, Cosette. Valjean rescues Cosette from her unloving and eccentric caretakers, Thénardier and Madame Thénardier (Sacha Baron Cohen and Helena Bonham Carter), and raises her as his own until she catches the eye of the young Revolutionary, Marius (Eddie Redmayne).

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Review: Black Death

A well-made movie isn’t always an enjoyable one, but, then again, not every movie is meant to be enjoyable, per-se. Whatever director Christopher Smith’s exact intentions are for Black Death, what we’ve got is a terrifyingly ominous experience bound to put a knot in your stomach. Smith braves the odds and offers something that denies us the hyped action churned out by the Hollywood machine and aims straight for the darkest, most realistic telling possible, which is bound to earn the admiration of some, but be a bit too much for others to handle.

It’s 1348 and the Black Death is consuming scores of the European population. After sending his lover into the forest to escape the disease, a young monk named Osmund (Eddie Redmayne) asks God to send him a sign to tell him if he should go after her. Shortly after, a Bishop’s envoy, Uric (Sean Bean), arrives in search of a man of God to guide him and his men to a plague–free village in the Great Marsh. It’s obvious to Osmund that this is his chance and regardless of the Father’s final foreboding warning, “even if you survive, the world out there will change you,” Osmund agrees to lead the band of warriors into the forest.

However, once away from the monastery, Uric reveals his true plan; they’re not in search of a safe haven, rather quite the opposite. The village is home to people who’ve renounced God in favor of the devil and amongst them is a necromancer, an individual with the ability to raise the dead. While the warriors gallantly and fearlessly ride into the darkness, Osmund holds on tight to his hope of reuniting with the woman he loves.

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Interview: Black Death Director Christopher Smith

We get a lot of horror movies and a lot of period pieces, but how about a horror period piece? That’s kind of what director Christopher Smith is offering with his new film Black Death. The film takes place in 1348 during the first outbreak of bubonic plague in England. It stars Eddie Redmayne as a monk who leads Ulric (Sean Bean) and his band of warriors to a remote village rumored to have renounced God and house a necromancer, someone with the ability to raise the dead. Not only do the men go to battle with ruthless enemies, but they also must evade the plague.

While Smith is certainly a seasoned horror director, he never makes the same genre film twice. Creep is an eerie mystery, Severance a scary comedy, Triangle a mind-bending nightmare and now there’s Black Death, the horror period piece. Even with his years of experience, the first day on the set of Black Death did rouse concerns of how he’d manage to pull this one off. Yes, the visuals matter in every film, but set design and costumes are pivotal in the case of a historical piece. Throw that into the mix with story development, shooting battle sequences and, well, every other element involved in making a film and Smith really had his hands full.

Lucky for him, not only did he adapt quickly to his timely surroundings, but he had an excellent team of collaborators by his side to contribute as he dove head first in bringing Dario Poloni’s script to life. In honor of the film’s March 11th release, Smith took the time to tell Shockya all about his love of the genre, reworking portions of the story, making the film feel as real as possible, working with his cast and much more. Check it all out in the video interview below.

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Review: The Yellow Handkerchief

The Yellow Handkerchief. Who came up with that? There is nothing stimulating about that title. Forgiveness could be granted if this so-called yellow handkerchief had a defining moment in the film, but no. In fact, the yellow handkerchief’s 15 seconds of fame could have been easily replaced by something much bolder. Perhaps hoisting a yellow sail on a small boat? Just like the unnecessary inclusion of the yellow hanky, director Udayan Prasad makes the film tiresome by searching for meaning in vague places when the film works best in its simplicity.

After spending six years in jail, Brett Hanson (William Hurt) returns to civilization. With no one to greet him at the prison gates, he drifts along and into a quaint town for no other reason but to enjoy the long lost taste of an ice-cold beer. In an effort to escape her own troubles, Martine (Kristen Stewart) takes an opportunity to hitch a ride with a complete stranger, a rather slow young guy named Gordy (Eddie Redmayne). The trio of strangers randomly decide to venture off on a scenic tour of post-Katrina Louisiana heading straight for New Orleans.

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