Tag Archives: Eddie Marsan

Review: Jack the Giant Slayer

Jack-the-Giant-SlayerTim Burton hit it big with “Alice in Wonderland,” but the fairy tale-to-film effort is still a horrifyingly expensive crapshoot.

As children, both Jack and Isabelle took a liking to the legend of the giants of Gantua. However, now young adults, neither is remotely close to achieving any degree of adventure, Jack (Nicholas Hoult) stuck working on his uncle’s farm and Isabelle (Eleanor Tomlinson) forced to be a proper princess, staying within the walls of Cloisters. However, after a mix-up at the market, Jack accidently winds up with a sack full of magic beans. Coincidentally, later that evening, Isabelle opts to sneak out of the castle and winds up at Jack’s door seeking shelter from a storm. Little does Jack know, one of his beans slipped through the house’s floorboards, right along with the rainwater that triggers them to grow.

After a failed attempt at saving Isabelle, she’s lifted up into the land of the giants while Jack comes crashing back down to Earth. When King Brahmwell (Ian McShane) hears of what’s happened to his daughter, he commissions Elmont (Ewan McGregor), the leader of the king’s guard, and his men to scale the beanstalk with Jack in tow to bring Isabelle home.

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From the Set: Jack the Giant Slayer

Jack-the-Giant-Slayer-PosterWe’ve already seen Alice in Wonderland and a double dose of Snow White, but with Maleficent, Pan,Sleeping Beauty, Pinocchio and possibly more fairy tales-turned-big screen epics hitting theaters in the coming years, perhaps Bryan Singer’s Jack the Giant Slayer will actually wind up slipping in at just the opportune time.

The project is a long time coming for Singer. He first signed on to direct back in September of 2009, but didn’t get the green light until just over a year later after which he went through a lengthy pre-production process before finally bringing the project to set in the spring and summer of 2011. Even then, the film still wasn’t in the clear, getting ousted from its original Summer 2012 drop date, settling back in on March 22nd, only to be moved up to March 1, 2013.

Will the tale of Nicholas Hoult’s Jack, a lowly farm boy who scales a beanstalk to save Princess Isabelle (Eleanor Tomlinson) from a brigade of giants eager to destroy King Brahmwell’s (Ian McShane) kingdom, be worth the wait? With the latest release date locked in place and now just a month away, we’ll find out soon enough, but if the final product sucks you into the world with even a fraction of the force the experience standing on set during production did, Singer’s time will have been well spent.

Click here to read the full set visit and here for additional interview highlights.

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Review: Snow White and the Huntsman

While I was determined to judge Snow White and the Huntsman and Mirror Mirror impartially, from day one, I always had an inkling of which of the two I’d prefer. However, it turns out, even with the advantage of a little bit of bias, Rupert Sanders still couldn’t trump Tarsem Singh.

In a darker twist on the beloved fairy tale, Snow White’s (Kristen Stewart) widowed father, King Magnus (Noah Huntley), marries the beautiful Ravenna (Charlize Theron) only to find out that she’s hell bent on gaining power, even if it means taking her new husband’s life. After Ravenna murders Magnus, Snow White is banished to the dungeon. Ravenna spends her years feeding off the young and innocent to maintain her youth, but when Snow White comes of age, the only way for Ravenna to remain the fairest of all if for Snow White to die.

However, just before Ravenna can end her life, Snow White escapes and is chased into the dark forest. Desperate to have her back alive, Ravenna strikes a deal with a huntsman (Chris Hemsworth) to track her down. Meanwhile, Snow White’s childhood friend William (Sam Claflin) is all grown up as well and upon hearing that she’s still alive, he vows to rescue her.

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Review: War Horse

There’s a reason why Steven Spielberg is so successful; he knows how to make a movie for everyone. Jaws, E.T., Jurassic Park, Catch Me If You Can and more. Sure, not all of them can be considered pristine filmmaking, but still, generally all of his films are incredibly enjoyable and not only does War Horse follow suit in terms of entertainment and emotional value, but quality-wise, it’s certainly on the top tier.

After his pride gets the better of him during an auction, Ted Narracott’s (Peter Mullan) son, Albert (Jeremy Irvine), becomes responsible for making the young horse Joey worth the hefty price his father paid. Albert dedicates every waking hour to Joey, training him to pull a plow so the Narracott’s can get their failing farm back in order and keep them from losing their home. However, just when everything seems to be going to plan, Joey is snatched up by World War I.

Never forgetting Albert’s training and care, Joey goes on to ride with the English army as well as the German army, making additional bonds along the way including British soldier Captain Nicholls (Tom Hiddleston) and a young girl named Emilie (Celine Buckens). Meanwhile, Albert’s distracted from his longing for Joey by the war, getting thrown into battle himself.

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Interview: The Disappearance of Alice Creed’s Gemma Arterton

If you’ve only seen Gemma Arterton in big budget productions like Quantum of SolaceClash of the Titans andPrince of Persia, you’re really missing out. Lucky for you, Arterton has something new hitting theaters on August 6th and while The Disappearance of Alice Creed may not have been showered with cash and effects like those other productions, it’s certainly far more powerful.

Arterton stars as Alice Creed, the poor young woman Vic and Danny (Eddie Marsan and Martin Compston) target in their kidnapping scheme. They confine their terrified victim to a room while they move along with their plan to make some quick cash at her expense. What Vic and Danny don’t know is that Alice has no intentions of being a good hostage and obeying their orders; she wants to fight back and survive.

For someone who only knows big budget Gemma, Alice Creed Gemma is absolutely going to blow them away. The actress was well aware of the stereotype she was developing and signed on for this project in an effort to show what she’s capable of and boy does she, but it wasn’t easy. During our recent chat, Arterton talked about the difficulties that came along with playing the role as well as the massive payoff and so much more. Check it all out in the interview below.

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Tribeca Interview: The Disappearance Of Alice Creed’s J Blakeson

After seeing a movie like The Disappearance of Alice Creed, you’d expect the writer-director to be a bit on the peculiar side. That couldn’t be farther from the truth when it comes to J Blakeson. In fact, Blakeson was even able to rationalize the existence of a degree of intimacy in kidnapping.

In the movie, Gemma Arterton is poor Alice Creed, the young lady Vic and Danny (Eddie Marsan and Martin Compston) target in their kidnapping scheme. After they’ve got their victim secured in a supposedly error-proof location, Vic and Danny’s original plan begins to crumble courtesy of a handful of striking revelations.

The film is oozing with suspense and tension from beginning to end. Just when you think you know what’s coming next, Blakeson throws in a curveball forcing the viewer to stay on his or her toes. You’d think a twist-ridden film would grow tiresome or disorderly, but Blakeson demonstrates a masterful level of control and shows off his keen eye behind the lens. I strongly advise you to check out this video interview, not because I enjoy seeing my work attract traffic, but because you should get to know J Blakeson; he’s here to stay.

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Tribeca Review: The Disappearance Of Alice Creed

Van? Check. Location? Check. Masks? Check. Gun? Check. Vic and Danny (Eddie Marsan and Maritn Compston) had it all planned out. Kidnap a young woman, hold her for ransom and take off with the loot. But all that changed when they opted to take Alice Creed (Gemma Arterton).

That’s about all the plot detail I can give without spoiling one of The Disappearance of Alice Creed’s many twists, and revealing just one would tarnish the experience. Once the theater lights dim hold on tight, because writer-director J. Blakeson jumps right into the action. This is no glorified depiction of a kidnapping where someone’s thrown into a room with a cot and served food when necessary. Alice is kept completely restrained not permitted to do a single thing on her own, even go to the bathroom. If you’re able to get through the onset of her abusive and humiliating ordeal, the payoff is huge.

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