Tag Archives: Dermot Mulroney

Review: Jobs

Jobs_Poster“Jobs” is an entirely wooden and bland representation of the tech icon, but for Apple devotees, it’ll still have an appeal as an informative biopic.

“Jobs” features Ashton Kutcher as Apple co-founder, Steve Jobs. The narrative hones in on him during his earlier years, shortly after dropping out of Reed College. Later on, while working at Atari, Jobs’ enormous ego earns him a make-or-break assignment he truly can’t handle, so he reconnects with his old friend and computer genius, Steve Wozniak (Josh Gad). After fixing the Atari problem, one of Wozniak’s pet projects catches Jobs’ eye, the beginnings of the personal computer. Through his insatiable dedication to creating the best possible product, Jobs forms Apple Computer alongside Wozniak, a company that ultimately grows to become one of the most profitable in the world.

“Jobs” needs to be assessed from two standpoints – as a film and nothing more, and also as a film for the Apple lover. Steve Jobs does not come across as a particularly likable guy for the majority of the movie, but his ideals clearly made Apple what it is today and, personally, that’s precisely why I’m a dedicated Apple user. Jobs wasn’t out to make devices so they could compete in the market and turn a profit; he wanted Apple computers, iPods, and beyond to be as simple and natural to use as your average kitchen appliance, a model that leads to so much more. For those who are as attached to their laptops, iPhones, and iPads as I am, the devices have become almost like an additional appendage, something that’s integral to getting work done, but also something that offers a release through games, lets you connect with family and friends, and more. Many talk of the dream of being able to disconnect, but personally, I could never imagine such a thing. Regardless of the occasional unwanted e-mail, my Apple products make every day better.

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Review: The Grey

Liam Neeson and director Joe Carnahan are back together again, but this time around, they’re working with material that’s far less fun than The A-Team. But less fun doesn’t make The Grey a bad movie. In fact, it’s quite the opposite. Rather than turn The Grey into an utterly unrealistic survival adventure story, we get something far darker and, while it still has those handful of moments that make you think twice, it completely sells the severity of the situation.

Neeson’s Ottway works for a petroleum company in the icy tundra of Alaska. Amidst the other ex-cons, fugitives and “men unfit for mankind,” Ottway’s job is to keep them safe by shooting down invading wolves. When it’s time to return to society, Ottway and a number of his colleagues board a plane to Anchorage. Along the way, turbulent weather takes hold and the plane comes crashing down in the middle of nowhere – actually, in the middle of wolf territory.

The few survivors are thankful to be alive, but soon come to the harsh realization that they’re being hunted. With no food and few supplies, the group has to band together to keep each other safe from the wolves who look to viciously pick them off one-by-one.

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Interview: The Family Tree’s Dermot Mulroney

We get our fair share of dysfunctional families on the big screen, but very few to the extent of the Burnetts in The Family Tree. Dermot Mulroney stars as the papa bear, Jack. When his wife, Bunnie (Hope Davis), gets knocked out during some naughty and unfaithful role-playing, Jack finds her at the hospital unable to remember anything that happened after they were married. While trying to bring Bunnie up-to-date, Jack also must keep an eye on his gun-loving and borderline religious fanatic of a son, Eric (Max Thieriot), and his daughter, Kelly (Britt Robertson), who’s enjoying exploring her romantic options.

In honor of The Family Tree’s August 26th release in New York and Los Angeles, Mulroney took the time to talk a bit about making the film. With dozens of titles to his name, Mulroney’s experience working on set has undoubtedly changed over the years. Sure, some things are tougher as there tend to be fewer resources to go around, but the additional pressure also keeps the cast and crew on their toes, propelling their effort to bring the audience the best possible final product.

Check out what Mulroney had to say about re-teaming with his good friend Hope Davis, overcoming his past troubles learning the lines, what he’s working on next and much more in the interview below.

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Defending Bad Movies: Georgia Rule

Regardless of whether or not you think she deserves what she’s getting, Lindsay Lohan must be feeling pretty rotten these days and I can’t help but to feel a little sympathetic, even if it’s just the slightest bit. So, in honor of Lohan’s downfall, while everyone else is knocking the once promising actress, I’m going to give her a little credit. In fact, I’ll do so for a film that not only marked the starting point of her demise, but one that got universally panned as well, Georgia Rule.

The film stars Lohan as Rachel Wilcox, a rotten city kid who’s sent to spend the summer with her grandmother, Georgia (Jane Fonda), in hopes it’ll straighten her out. Rachel’s mother, Lilly (Felicity Huffman), may let her get away with misbehaving at home, but at Georgia’s Idaho abode, things are different and Rachel must abide by “Georgia Rule.” When Rachel isn’t getting her mouth washed out with soap, she’s either working at the vet Simon’s (Dermot Mulroney) office or trying to corrupt the local golden boy Harlan (Garrett Hedlund). Rachel manages to squeeze by committing only a handful of atrocities until one of her stories takes things a bit too far. When Rachel tells Simon her mother’s boyfriend molested her, he tells Georgia who tells Rachel’s mother who returns to Idaho to straighten things out during which the harbored frustrations between three generations boil over.

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