Tag Archives: Christoph Waltz

Review: Django Unchained

Django-Unchained-PosterYou can always count on Quentin Tarantino to go big and take chances to offer up some of the most wildly engaging, entertaining and all-around enjoyable experiences cinema’s got to offer.

Amidst a treacherous trek across the country, Django (Jamie Foxx) and his new slave owners are intercepted by the bounty hunter, Dr. King Schultz (Christoph Waltz). The next kill on Schultz’s list are the notorious Brittle Brothers, but he doesn’t know what they look like. However, Django does. After a little unorthodox bartering, Schultz makes off with Django, but not as his slave, rather as an associate.

Django rides by Schultz’s side, learning the ways of the bounty hunter and helping Schultz complete his gigs. In turn, Schultz offers to help track down and rescue Django’s wife, Broomhilda (Kerry Washington), from her new owner, Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio). Trouble is, Candie isn’t a particularly nice guy, and he’ll never sell Broomhilda to Schultz if Schultz rides up to the estate alongside a black man and simply asks. If Schultz and Django are going to get her back, they’ll need to make Candie think he’s got the upper hand in an incredible deal.

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Comic-Con 2012: Our Most Anticipated Events

The first rule of San Diego Comic-Con is that there’s absolutely no way to get to everything. The second rule of San Diego Comic-Con (or SDCC) is … try to get to everything. And we here at Movies.com will attempt to do just that, or at the very least bring back a taste of the big events everyone will be talking about come this time next week.

What are some of those events, and what should you expect from our coverage? Click through to find out what we’re looking forward to most as the country’s biggest geek-friendly convention prepares to infiltrate our nerdy hearts later this week.

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Review: The Green Hornet

So maybe no superhero movie is sensible, but this new breed of films focusing on average guys trying to be heroes does require a sense of realism. The Green Hornet certainly has that element throughout most of the film, but it also has a significant amount of those outlandish, no-man-could-possibly-survive-that incidents. The mixture of the two plus a hefty dose of laughs from star and co-writer, Seth Rogen, does make for a wildly enjoyable film, but one that doesn’t quite know what tone it’s looking to achieve.

Britt Reid (Rogen) is a spoiled brat. His father, James (Tom Wilkinson) owns The Daily Sentinel newspaper among other lucrative outlets, so Britt’s never had to work a day in his life. His sour attitude isn’t all his fault; Britt’s father is fairly tough on him. He even decapitated his favorite toy when he was a child. Even so, he’s the king of media and very well respected in the field. When he suddenly passes away, there’s just one person to inherit his empire, Britt. With zero interest in journalism or working at all for that matter, Britt decides to fill his time by teaming up with his father’s former mechanic and coffeemaker, Kato (Jay Chou), to live on the edge and steal the head of his father’s memorial statue from the burial ground. Just before they can make their getaway, Britt catches sight of a mugging and takes action. Well, actually, Kato takes action; Britt’s merely in the way.

Regardless, Britt thinks they make the perfect team and should become masked heroes. Been there, done that, right? Britt’s doing it differently this time around. He suggests they pose as bad guys so they can topple Chudnofsky’s (Christoph Waltz) LA crime monopoly from the inside. When they’re not cruising around in the armed-to-the-tee Black Beauty and testing out all of Kato’s high-tech weapons, they’re in the office using the Sentinel to glamorize the Green Hornet’s threat. Before they know it, they’re fully entrenched in a world of crime and dirty politics.

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Oscars 2010: Forget Who Should Win, This Is Who I Want To Win

Even if a film is the clear favorite in the eyes of the Academy, it doesn’t mean that you want it to take home the Oscar. The Academy Awards Ceremony is about honoring films that achieved a high degree of excellence, but excellence doesn’t always represent the film’s entertainment value. If the Academy awarded the statue to the film that’s most likely to be watched over and over again, the screenplay that has the most memorable one-liners or simply to the most inspiring underdog, it might look something like this:

Best Picture: Inglourious Basterds

Not only is this my favorite film of the year, every time I watch it, it gets better. Everything about this film is spectacular. I’ve had endless arguments with myself about my favorite scene. Yes, I had an argument with myself.

I’ll Be Pissed If This Wins: The Blind Side

This is a lovely feel-good movie, but an Oscar contender? I’m angry enough The Blind Side nabbed a nomination; if it steals a win from a more deserving film (like any of the other nine nominees), I’ll never forgive Sandra Bullock. (Sorry Sandy, I know it’s not your fault, but the blame inherently falls on you.)

Actor in a Leading Role: Jeremy Renner

Perhaps my support for Renner stems from the fact that he’s the clear underdog, but anyone who has seen The Hurt Locker knows he puts on a stellar performance.

I’ll Be Pissed If He Wins: George Clooney

He’s good, but he’s still the actor George Clooney. Clooney passes as Ryan Bingham in Up In The Air not because of the power of performance, but because the film, as a whole, is fantastic.

Actor in a Supporting Role: Christoph Waltz

Screw the underdog here. Waltz has nabbed every award out there for his performance in Inglourious Basterds and deserves to top off his successful run with the Oscar.

I’ll Be Pissed If He Wins: Stanley Tucci

Sorry Mr. Tucci, but I can’t forgive Peter Jackson for destroying one of my favorite books, The Lovely Bones. Tucci works with what he’s given, but is incapable of putting on an award-winning performance because a shoddy screenplay makes it impossible.

Actress in a Leading Role: Gabourey Sidibe

This award better go to one of the young’ins in the running. I’d be thrilled to see either Sidibe or Carey Mulligan nab the award, but I’d prefer to see Sidibe make her first feature film performance an Oscar-winning one. Some say Sidibe wasn’t acting in Precious. Did these individuals not see the film? What about Sidibe’s numerous appearances on talk shows? This girl is the polar opposite of her character. She’s cheery, hilarious, humble and totally deserving of this honor.

I’ll Be Pissed If She Wins: Sandra Bullock

I could keep it simple and tell you to refer back to the Best Film section, but I can rant about The Blind Side issue all day. Sandra Bullock for Best Actress? What the @#$%? Not only is the film not worthy of an Oscar nomination, but neither is Bullock’s performance. On top of that, her spot should have gone to Avatar’s Zoe Salanda.

Actress in a Supporting Role: Mo’Nique

Both the supporting actor and actress categories are no contest. Mo’Nique’s performance as Mary in Precious is downright chilling. Come to think of it, she’s more of a villain than Waltz’s Hans Landa.

I’ll Be Pissed If She Wins: Penelope Cruz

How is Nine eligible to win anything? This film is terrible. Cruz’s performance isn’t even particularly notable. If anyone from Nine got a nomination, it should have been Marion Cotillard.

Animated Feature Film: Fantastic Mr. Fox

Call me crazy but I didn’t enjoy Up nearly as much as the majority of moviegoers. Call me heartless, but not once did I get the urge to shed a tear. Fantastic Mr. Fox, on the other hand, was an absorbing and immensely enjoyable experience. Everything from the voice work to the animation is brilliant.

I’ll Be Pissed If This Wins: Coraline

This movie just rubbed me the wrong way. It doesn’t know what it should be, a children’s film or a horror film, and gets lost in the mix.

Directing: James Cameron

Avatar wasn’t my favorite film of the year, but it did make it to number three on my list. I’m going with Cameron not because he excels in comparison to his competition, but because he deserves it. He spent fifteen years developing the project, pumped in about $300 million and delivered big time. You don’t make the top grossing film of all time and not get an Oscar for it.

I’ll Be Pissed If He/She Wins: Nothing.

I have a preference for whom I’d like to see win, but every individual is deserving of their nomination and I’ll be glad to see anyone take home the statue.

Writing (Original Screenplay): Inglourious Basterds

Quentin Tarantino is a damn genius. You know how there are always particular portions of a film you look forward to? Well, I’m thrilled about every second of this one. Everything is perfectly timed and presented with each word in the screenplay serving a purpose.

I’ll Be Pissed If This Wins: Anything But Basterds

I refuse to budge on this category. Inglourious Basterds must win or I will not be happy.

Writing (Adapted Screenplay): Up in the Air

This is a tough one. Precious is an excellent book-to-film adaption, but the manner in which Jason Reitman and Sheldon Turner manipulated Walter Kirn’s novel is especially impressive. Up in the Air the film is far different from the book, yet respects the original elements necessary to maintain the story’s sense of heart and effectively expresses it on screen.

I’ll Be Pissed If This Wins: In the Loop Continue reading

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