Tag Archives: Chloe Moretz

The YA Countdown: The Latest Buzz on ‘The Fifth Wave,’ ‘Allegiant’ and ‘The Fault in Our Stars’

Fault_in_our_StarsClearly the young-adult book-to-film adaption craze isn’t slowing down anytime soon, but it seems as though the success of Divergent may have triggered a few major steps forward because we’ve got new details on three high-profile projects.

First Clip from The Fault in Our Stars

If you thought the chemistry between Shailene Woodley and Ansel Elgort in the trailer for The Fault in Our Stars was palpable, just wait until you catch the first clip from the Josh Boone adaptation.

In the film, Woodley leads as Hazel, a 16-year-old cancer patient. She manages to survive with stage four thyroid cancer with metastasis forming in her lungs, but Hazel still has a tendency to keep to herself and that’s why her mother insists that she attend a support group. Even though Hazel isn’t thrilled with the idea, she changes her tune after meeting Elgort’s Augustus Waters, an osteosarcoma survivor. The connection is instant and profound. She’s never felt this way about someone before, let alone have that person feel the same way back, but even though their bond feels so right, she often struggles and wonders, is it wrong to pursue it given her condition?

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10 Differences Between the ‘Carrie’ Remake & Original 1976 Movie

Carrie-Differences-Remake-OriginalCarrie may have taken her telekinetic wrath from the 1970s to modern day, but beyond that, Kimberly Peirce’s Carrie falls right in line with the Brian De Palma original. However, even though the films hit all the same beats, share character names, and even some dialogue, the 2013 version isn’t a total copy and paste job. The structure stays the same, but by using a little modernization, additional character details and new scenes here and there, Peirce essentially recreates the same experience while trying to make it her own (read our Carrie remake review).

Whether or not that remake technique works for you, if you’re a fan of the original, it certainly makes pinpointing those differences an entertaining game. Check out all the changes we caught in the new Carrie and let us know which ones you spotted, too.

It goes without saying that the following post contains SPOILERS for Carrie and the 2013 Carrie remake.

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Interview: Kick-Ass 2’s Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Chloe Moretz & Christopher Mintz-Plasse

kickass2video1Growing up means three very different things to Dave Lizewski (Aaron Taylor-Johnson), Mindy Macready (Chloë Grace Moretz) and Chris D’Amico (Christopher Mintz-Plasse) in Kick-Ass 2.

Dave is busy trying to follow his destiny and make a difference as Kick-Ass, Mindy, on the other hand, switches gears, locks away her arsenal, and tries to be normal, while Chris transforms from Red Mist into The Mother F%&*^r, hell-bent on avenging his father’s death.

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‘Carrie’ Remake Bloodies Up New York Comic-Con

Wouldn’t it have been cool if someone doused Chloe Moretz in pig’s blood, and out of rage she sent objects flying throughout the room and the IGN Theater erupted in pure chaos? Sadly there’s no firsthand account of Carrie’s rage to report from New York Comic-Con, but Moretz, Julianne Moore, producer Kevin Misher and director Kimberly Peirce did offer up a sense of what we can expect from the highly anticipated remake.

With roots in the Stephen King novel, Carrie features Moretz as the title character, a teenager with an overbearing mother (Moore) and abusive peers who loses it, unleashing the wrath of her telekinetic powers on the town.

The Big Highlights

— The teaser (online this weekis short and sweet, but has a nice energy and eeriness to it. The environment, effects and camera movement hint at the modernization of the material and a potentially flashier shooting style. Too short to confirm the remake is going to be worthwhile, but it at least puts it on the right track.

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Interview: Hugo’s Asa Butterfield, Ben Kingsley, Chloe Moretz And More

What better way to spend the most magical time of year than by seeing a particularly magical and inspiring movie? No, this isn’t a review – that you can find right here – but there’s really no way to talk about Hugo without being swept right back up by that incredible adventure.

Based on Brian Selznick’s book, The Invention of Hugo Cabret, Martin Scorsese’s Hugo tells the tale of a young orphan named Hugo (Asa Butterfield) who keeps the clocks running in a 1930s Paris train station by day and tries to finish his deceased father’s work by night, restoring an old automaton. In attempt to find the pieces to fix the elaborate machine, Hugo targets Georges Méliès’ (Sir Ben Kingsley) train station toy stand. And yes, that’s Georges Méliès as in the iconic filmmaker of the late 1800s and early 1900s. Méliès catches Hugo in the act and after finding some stolen goods and Hugo’s notebook of automaton instructions, rather than merely reprimand him, Méliès is so distressed by his findings he takes and threatens to burn Hugo’s notebook. However, with the help of Méliès’ goddaughter, Isabelle (Chloe Moretz), Hugo not only comes closer to fixing the automaton, but fixing Méliès, too.

In honor of Hugo’s November 23rd release, a large portion of the gang assembled for a press conference. Producer Graham King, screenwriter John Logan, the station inspector Sacha Baron Cohen, Lisette the flower shop owner Emily Mortimer, Moretz, Butterfield, Kingsley and novelist Brian Selznick all came out to talk about working with Scorsese, dabbling in film history while making a film and so much more. Check out some of the highlights in the transcription below.

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Review: Hugo

Part of the beauty of filmmaking, is the ability to transport viewers to another reality. Back in the late 1800s and early 1900s, filmmaker Georges Méliès seized the opportunity to put stop tricks and painted film cells to use, combining his skills as a magician and filmmaker to, quite literally, bring dreams to life. Ultimately, we’re still doing the very same thing today, but with the wildly advanced technology and more thorough understanding of storytelling, director Martin Scorsese has created one of the most successful attempts at bringing an audience into the movie with Hugo.

It’s the 1930s in Paris, France. After losing his father (Jude Law) in a terrible fire, young Hugo Cabret (Asa Butterfield) is forced to live with his only relative, his uncle, Claude (Ray Winstone). A far from responsible drunk, Claude pulls Hugo out of school and shows him the ropes at work, teaching Hugo to keep the clocks running at a Paris train station. And it’s a good thing, too, because when Claude leaves Hugo to his lonesome, it’s up to Hugo to keep things timely.

When he isn’t tending to his train station duties, Hugo is hard at work at the one thing his father left behind, an automaton. Hugo regularly snatches up food and milk from the train station vendors and also frequents grumpy old Georges Méliès’ (Ben Kingsley) toy stand, a place prime for automaton part collecting. When Méliès catches Hugo in the act, he demands the boy empty his pockets. Amidst the usual mess of rogue toy parts is a notebook with automaton drawings and instructions that oddly rub Méliès the wrong way. When Méliès takes Hugo’s precious notebook, Hugo turns to Méliès’ goddaughter, Isabelle (Chloe Moretz), for help and the two discover they have a lot to offer one another, Isabelle helping Hugo get his automaton up and running and Hugo giving Isabelle a taste of adventure.

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Hailee Steinfeld’s Next Film — Could It Be ‘The Hunger Games?’

Hailee Steinfeld is no longer just the girl from the K-Mart Blingitude commercial or the young actress from a handful of short films for that matter; she’s a critically acclaimed actress and quite possibly even an Oscar contender for Best Supporting Actress (she already won Best Young Actress at the Critic’s Choice Awards). Of course it’s a special thing to be cast in a Coen brothers movie, but in Steinfeld’s case, being cast as Mattie Ross in ‘True Grit’ is life changing.

It should come as no surprise that with this particularly big break will come an assortment of film offers – and rumors of offers, too. Lately, we’ve been hearing quite a lot about Steinfeld potentially portraying Katniss Everdeen in the film adaptation of Suzanne Collins‘ wildly popular book, ‘The Hunger Games.’ From the start, I’ve championed Chloe Moretz for the part not only because she’s a spectacular actress, but also because there was really nobody else who could handle the part. Well, after catching ‘True Grit,’ my ideal casting for the lead role in this potential blockbuster franchise changed and Ms. Moretz has slipped to option #2.

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