Tag Archives: Barbara Hershey

Review: Insidious Chapter 2

Insidious_Chapter_2_PosterThe talented team of filmmakers manage to elevate the uneven narrative, but as a dedicated fan of the original, “Insidious: Chapter 2” needed to be refined and unnervingly calculating. Instead, it’s just entertaining.

The sequel picks up right where the first film left off. Dalton Lambert (Ty Simpkins) is back from The Further, but Elise (Lin Shaye) is long gone. During the police investigation, Josh and Renai take the boys to his mother Lorraine’s (Barbara Hershey) home, but almost immediately after moving in, Renai and Lorraine come to realize that they’re still being haunted.

While Renai does her best to convince Josh that their family is at risk, Lorraine takes matters into her own hands, calls up Tucker and Specs (Angus Sampson and Leigh Whannell) and starts to investigate. With the help of Elise’s old colleague Carl (Steve Coulter), they try to put the pieces together so they can close the Lambert family’s connection to the spirit world once and for all.

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Screen Rant’s 10 Most Anticipated Horror Movies of 2013

Horror-Movie-Preivew-2013Ready for a year of straight slasher flicks, horror anthologies, paranormal entities, home invasions, and more? 2013 is due to cover just about every corner of the horror genre – including remakes, adaptations, and even a few original ideas, too.

There’s dozens of prospective nightmare-inducing productions on the way (or already in theaters), but we’ve narrowed it down to the 10 that pack the most promising source material, stellar teams of talent, innovative core concepts and/or the potential for unprecedented carnage.

Check out our 10 Most Anticipated Horror Movies of 2013.

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Review: Insidious

It’s taken three months, but we’ve finally got a 2011 horror film worth seeing; something overwhelmingly unnerving with the power to keep you up at night, Insidious. It’s got a little Nightmare on Elm Street, a part The Exorcist and a hint of Paranormal Activity, too and the results certainly honor genre expectations all while delivering an exhilarating, unique and horrifyingly unpredictable experience.

Josh and Renai (Patrick Wilson and Rose Byrne) are a pretty happy couple. They’ve had their issues, but are leaving them behind by moving into a beautiful new home with their three children. All is well until their eldest son, Dalton (Ty Simpkins), opts to do some exploring and winds up falling off a ladder in the attic. The next morning, Dalton won’t wake up. Josh and Renai take him to the hospital, but only to find out that he’s inexplicably in a coma.

Three months pass and now, not only is Dalton still in his state, but Josh and Renai have a new problem on their hands, strange and downright terrifying bumps in the night. When Renai comes to the conclusion that their new abode is haunted, unlike in any other film of the genre, the family actually moves. However, house swapping doesn’t rid them of their ghostly guests, rather intensifies the situation.

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Review: Black Swan

As is said in the film, ballet isn’t for everyone and neither is Black Swan, which really should be considered an honor more than anything. The film is overwhelming in every sense of the word and could just be too much for some to handle. But, if you have what it takes to absorb this wild mixture of personalities, visuals and nightmares, the result is profound. This is easily one of the most emotionally impactful films of the year and is something that will certainly haunt you long after the credits roll in the best possible way.

Natalie Portman is Nina Sayers, a professional ballet dancer desperate to be in the spotlight. When the lead dancer in her company, Beth (Winona Ryder), is forced to retire, Nina finally gets the opportunity to audition for the lead role in their production of Swan Lake in which the White and Black Swans are played by the same performer. When the director, Thomas (Vincent Cassel), tells Nina she’s a natural for the role of the elegant and pristine White Swan, but lacks the natural sensuality required to play the Black Swan, Nina’s only chance to get the part is to give into Thomas’ sexual advances.

Once Nina is named the Swan Queen, the pressure to perform consumes her. Not only is her ex-ballerina mother (Barbara Hershey) keeping an incessantly watchful eye on her, but Nina herself must keep an eye on her competition, specifically the new free-spirited performer Lily (Mila Kunis). Lily embodies everything Thomas imagines the Black Swan to be, something Nina cannot achieve no matter how much she rehearses. As opening night draws near, Nina’s obsession with perfection becomes increasingly suffocating, disturbing and dangerous.

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