Monthly Archives: January 2013

Interview: Me @ The Zoo’s Chris Crocker

Me_at_the_Zoo_PosterWhat do you think when you hear the name Chris Crocker? Let me guess – “Leave Britney alone!” Chris Moukarbel and Valerie Veatch’s documentary about the eccentric video blogger-turned-Internet sensation likely won’t change that, but it will show that there’s much more to Crocker than an emotional Britney fanboy.

It all started when Crocker’s homophobic high school and disapproving neighbors left him restricted to his home with his grandparents, Britney Spears posters and a camera. With little else to do and few ways to express his feelings, Crocker took to posting uncensored, impassioned and often curious videos on the Internet. Soon enough, Crocker amassed a following, regularly attracting millions of views per video. However, after uploading the epic “Leave Britney Alone” during which he sobs and pleads for Britney’s wellbeing, Crocker received a volatile amount of attention, something that turned him into a celebrity of sorts, but also doused him in criticism.

As someone who began “Me @ the Zoo” associating Crocker with little more than “Leave Britney alone,” it’s almost jarring to see him presented as a real person, let alone speak with him. He is just as unconventional and outspoken as all of his videos suggest, but Crocker is also strangely charming, thoughtful and grounded by the fact that he deeply believes in what he fights for. Check out what Crocker had to say about handing over the camera and letting someone else tell his story, his hopes for the future and much more in the interview below, and be sure to catch “Me @ the Zoo” on iTunes today.

Click here to read the interview.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Interviews

Interview: John Dies at the End’s Don Coscarelli and Paul Giamatti

Paul_Giamatti_Don_Coscarelli_John_Dies_at_the_EndDavid Wong’s book warns, “STOP. You should not have touched this book. NO, don’t put it down. It’s too late.” Too bad Don Coscarelli’s feature film adaptation of “John Dies at the End” isn’t branded with the same advice because once you get sucked into his world of soy sauce, meat monsters and Korrok, there’s no turning back.

Straight from Wong’s book, Coscarelli’s film features Chase Williamson as David Wong, a harmless college dropout consumed by the effects of a drug known as soy sauce. The thing is, Dave wasn’t even looking to get high. He thought his buddy, John (Rob Mayes), overdosed on the black stuff, so he was just being a good friend by taking John to the hospital along with the needle he injected himself with. Trouble is, Dave puts the thing in his pocket, accidently sticking himself. From that point on, he’s got no choice, but to play along, using bratwurst phones and battling otherworldly creatures if he’s going to save the world. Paul Giamatti steps in as Arnie, a reporter who arrives after all the insanity goes down and is tasked with putting together the details of David’s seemingly bogus adventure.

With “John Dies at the End” due for a theatrical release on January 25th, Coscarelli and Giamatti sat down for a roundtable interview to discuss the meat of the film (no pun intended), the current state of the horror genre, where “John Dies at the End” fits in and more. Check out all the highlights from the interview in the video below.

Click here to watch the interview.

Leave a comment

Filed under Interviews

Screen Rant’s 10 Most Anticipated Horror Movies of 2013

Horror-Movie-Preivew-2013Ready for a year of straight slasher flicks, horror anthologies, paranormal entities, home invasions, and more? 2013 is due to cover just about every corner of the horror genre – including remakes, adaptations, and even a few original ideas, too.

There’s dozens of prospective nightmare-inducing productions on the way (or already in theaters), but we’ve narrowed it down to the 10 that pack the most promising source material, stellar teams of talent, innovative core concepts and/or the potential for unprecedented carnage.

Check out our 10 Most Anticipated Horror Movies of 2013.

Click here to read more.

Leave a comment

Filed under Features

‘The Hunger Games’ Countdown: Jennifer Lawrence for the Oscar Win

Jennifer_Lawrence_Silver_Linings_Playbook_Hunger_Games_OscarJennifer Lawrence’s Saturday Night Live episode may have been abysmal and quite possibly one of the worst of the season, but who can blame Lawrence? She was natural enough and tried to play along. When the writing is that unfunny all-around, there’s just so much even an Academy Award-nominated actress can do. So while her disappointing stint onSNL comes and goes, and hopefully rarely gets revisited on YouTube, Lawrence still has her Oscar nomination and, soon enough, that nod could become a win – and maybe even with a little help from Katniss.

Just because Lawrence is nominated for Best Actress in a Leading Role for her work in Silver Linings Playbook doesn’t mean her performance in The Hunger Games can’t have an effect on the vote. The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences is comprised of people and whether or not a nomination honors a single performance, those people are susceptible to outside forces and, considering The Hunger Games was a cinematic extravaganza that went on to please the large majority of critics, become the third-highest domestic earner of the year, and amass a legion of die-hard fans, it’s very likely that the Girl on Fire is in the back of voters’ minds.

Looking at the five ladies in contention, we can also narrow down the competition rather quickly. While little Quvenzhané Wallis is a revelation and her becoming the youngest Best Actress nominee in history is a thrill, Beasts of the Southern Wild will likely go on to enjoy a presence at the Academy Awards, but fall short of any wins. As one of my top 10 films of the year, it breaks my heart that Juan Antonio Bayona’s The Impossible missed out on a Best Picture nod, only going on to secure a single nomination. Naomi Watts is incredible and deserves to be in the running, but just like the film itself, she’ll fly under the radar.

Click here to read more.

Leave a comment

Filed under Features

Review: John Dies at the End

John_Dies_at_the_End_Poster“John Dies at the End” shouldn’t be a good movie. The narrative is just way too off the rails, there’s nearly no reasoning behind most of the plot points and the large majority of the visual effects are rather rough, but the power of smart and deeply dedicated filmmaking takes over and writer-director Don Coscarelli manages to lead his cast and crew through to an undeniably entertaining end product.

David Wong (Chase Williamson) is far from a golden boy, but he’s your pretty average slacker – that is until he comes in contact with “the sauce.” One night David and his buddy John (Rob Mayes) go to a party. John’s rocking out with his band while David’s moseying around, drinking his beer. He spots a jerk named Justin White (Johnny Weston) teasing Amy Sullivan (Fabianne Therese) about her prosthetic hand, and after rescuing said prosthetic hand, Amy tells David her dog bit some Jamaican guy and ran off. David tracks down the Jamaican guy who gives David the creeps by reading a recent dream and making him puke up a living bug. That’s enough for one night; David calls it quits, heads home and crashes.

Later that night, David’s awoken by a frantic call from John so he heads over to his place to check on him. Sure enough, John’s off his mind, running around his trashed apartment in his underwear. David tracks down the culprit, a syringe filled with a black liquid, and takes it and his deranged friend to the hospital. Trouble is, that black liquid’s got a mind of its own and David doesn’t make it very far before feeling the effects of the soy sauce himself.

Click here to read more.

Leave a comment

Filed under Reviews

Interview: John Dies At The End Writer-Director-Producer Don Coscarelli

John_Dies_at_the_End_PosterMeat monsters, flying moustaches, chest-sucking slugs and bratwursts that function as cell phones. Think all that’s a challenge to sell on the big screen? Director Don Coscarelli takes it one step further aiming to do just that within a non-linear narrative in his adaptation of David Wong’s off the wall, time-traveling novel, “John Dies at the End.”

The film stars Chase Williamson as Dave, a guy who goes from living the typical lazy slacker life to battling supernatural creatures and traveling to other worlds via a new drug known as soy sauce. In his attempt to rush his buddy John (Rob Mayes) to the hospital after indulging in a bit too much of the black stuff, David gets stuck with the needle himself, letting the sauce loose in his system, heightening his senses to a superhuman extent and making him the centerpiece of an epic battle to save the planet.

Think that sampling of “John Dies at the End” sounds a little off the rails? Just wait until you catch the full feature. The movie is currently available On Demand, but in honor of its January 25th theatrical release, Coscarelli sat down to talk soy sauce and all of its outrageous side effects. Check out what Coscarelli had to say about honing his narrative, finding the right actors to strike the perfect tone, the plan to manufacture meat monsters and more in the video interview below.

Click here to watch the interview.

Leave a comment

Filed under Interviews

The Best – and Worst – Movie Promos of the Week

In_Fear-PosterWatching Gary Busey consider the daily life and sexual tendencies of hobbits is disturbingly mesmerizing, but ultimately, it’s not out to promote The Hobbit, so the Best Stuff title has to go to three other contenders and, in a delightful timely fashion, three Sundance features go on to earn the honor.

The Best Stuff

1. In Fear PosterWhat happens when a lost-in-the-woods scenario collides with an “unknown tormentor?” You get something wildly eerie and clever – or at least as far as the poster’s concerned. The pressure is on big time for In Fear because I’m going to be very disappointed if the Sundance entry doesn’t give me a reason to hang this stellar design on my wall.

Click here to read more.

Leave a comment

Filed under Features